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Talking Heads - Lady of Letters by Alan Bennett.

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Introduction

Alan Bennett is the brain behind the BBC series - "Talking Heads". "Lady of Letters" is one of six monologues that Alan Bennett wrote for the BBC and was first aired in 1987. Miss Ruddock (Patricia Routledge - Keeping up Appearances) is a lonely and old woman who seems to have no friends or family. Miss Ruddock has very high standards. She spends a lot of her time observing other peoples lives and judging them by what they wear and the things they do and is not afraid of telling how she feels and can become quite nasty while doing so. Miss Ruddock seems to feel she has a big part to play in society and so feels the need to make her thoughts known whiter it is to the local doctor or the Queen Of England and she feels the easiest way to make her thoughts known is through letters hence the title "Lady Of Letters". ...read more.

Middle

Miss Ruddock is the kind of woman who will not change what she does because someone tells her to. She is warned not to write any more letters or she will be put in prison but as usual Miss Ruddock has a comment about something and this time it is about the magistrate. She describes what he looks like, she says "Big fellow, navy blue suit, poppy in his button hole. Looked a bit of a drinker." She really cannot help herself. She always has something to say. From that one line we get the impression that she may not stop the letters and may get sent to prison despite all the warnings that the police have gave her. The end of this scene is very important and very well written. Miss Ruddock is talking about the policeman at No 56 and the last line of the scene is "He wants reporting" Then it leads into the most important scene in the play - the prison scene. ...read more.

Conclusion

Now that she is in prison she accepts everyone and what they call her. When Miss Ruddock is telling us about the conversation her and Lucille had she mentions that Lucille said "You're Funny you, Irene". So Miss Ruddock now that she has friends and people to talk to, she does not mind what name people use to address her. In conclusion I think that Miss Ruddock was seeking some kind of attention when she wrote a letter to someone, she had no-one in her life to talk to so she just sent letters and complained about anything just to be able to tell someone something. Then Miss Ruddock got put in jail. She suddenly had friends to talk to about anything she wanted...so there was no need for argueing or causing trouble. If anyone else got sent to prison they would be really upset...not irene, She just looked at it as a new start in life, a new chance to gain some friends and some new skills. I wonder how it is going? ...read more.

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