Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
  • Document length: 2216 words

Tess and the color red. (Hardy)

Do not show me this again

Are you in the right place?

Jump to Thomas Hardy and see how teachers think you should prepare in:

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

TESS AND THE COLOR RED For an artist as visually sensitive as Hardy, colour is of the first importance and significance, and there is one colour which literary catches the eye, and is meant to catch it, throughout the book. This colour is red, the colour of blood, which is associated with Tess from first to last. It dogs her, disturbs her, destroys her. She is full of it, she spills it, she loses it. Watching Tess' life we begin to see that her destiny is nothing more or less than the colour red You'll want to make a list of all the times the colour red appears in the novel, from the roses Alec gives Tess, to the monstrous red threshing machine, to the shedding of blood. Divide these images into two groups- the positive, life-affirming ones and the negative, violent ones. Toward the conclusion of your paper, consider why Hardy uses the same colour to represent concepts as opposite as life and death, creation and destruction, love and hate. Discuss the importance of landscapes and environments in Tess. Hardy weaves imagery around the colours C. red and white There are two ways to approach this question. You can either write about Hardy's view of nature and man's place in it; or you can discuss how nature in Tess reflects the characters' feelings. ...read more.

Middle

tess of the durbervilles takes up too many damn pages cause hardy has some freaky fetish with adjectives and descripitions" I think it's interesting how the setting portrays the mood of the scene. Hardy describes the natural settings in different ways depending on how he want the reader to react. The appearance of the surroundings can also appear to change suddenly with a mood change, as just before and after Tess tells Angel about her rape Stonehenge: Although it might seem strange for Tess' arrest to occur at Stonehenge, I have come to the belief that Hardy attempts to symbolise the self-sacrifice of Tess to the entity of through the meaning of this location. Stonehenge is the most ancient monument in Great Britain, having been constructed circa 2800 BC by ancient peoples, of whom we know very little, who inhabited the island until the eighth and seventh centuries BC, when they were displaced by the Celts. During Hardy's time, it was speculated that Stonehenge was of Celtic origin and served a religious function in the culture. It was also understood, through the study of Roman accounts of the Celts, that their religious practices included human sacrifice and that Stonehenge may have been employed for this purpose. ...read more.

Conclusion

we really don't know who built it or why or when.) so using stonehenge hardy is able to actively confuse his readers. he uses these immense and frightening but meaningless stones to stand for the huge terrifying meaninglessness of tess' story. this novel is not a security blanket, it shows us a world full of threats we cannot understand and therefore cannot avoid. invoking the blind and unknown gods worshipped at stonehenge in a world before history helps hardy to communicate the full threat of his message tess of the durbervilles is set in the fictional county of wessex sometime in the 1880s. although wessex is fictional it is clearly identifiable as dorset in the south west of england (check a map or atlas). by the late 1800s (eg 1880) in dorset the increasing industrialisation of agriculture in the rural areas of britain were rapidly destabilising and destroying the old established farming communities. in tess' world human labour is giving way to mechanised labour, farming for food is being rapidly replaced by farming for money, the country produce is being exported to the cities for sale (rather than consumed in the communities themselves), young men are being drawn away from the countryside to the city in large numbers - leaving a surplus of young women on the farms, people with 'new' money made in the cities are buying up the old noble titles and so on and so on. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles essays

  1. Set in Wessex, "Tess of the D'Urbervilles" is a novel, which disregards the conventions ...

    Hardy describes the place as being lifeless and having no purpose which is what Tess Feels like "There were few trees or none" Again the weather represents what Tess feels like which is depressed "...were blown white and dusty, after a few hours rain" Hardy's description of setting not only

  2. Thomas Hardy sometimes uses the landscape to reflect mood of his characters. Choose two ...

    This quotation extends Tess's thinking into a broader field, making her feel more open and making the world beyond her looking cheerful. Another indicator of Tess's happiness on page 133 is when Hardy says, "Either the change in the quality of the air from heavy to light, or the sense

  1. Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891) by Thomas Hardy.

    Mercy Chant - The daughter of a friend of the Reverend Clare. Mr. Clare hopes Angel will marry Mercy, but after Angel marries Tess, Mercy becomes engaged to his brother Cuthbert instead. Tess Durbeyfield Intelligent, strikingly attractive, and distinguished by her deep moral sensitivity and passionate intensity, Tess is indisputably the central character of the novel that bears her name.

  2. Thomas Hardy, in the preface to his 'Poems of the past and the present' ...

    By the end of the poem, Hardy does not change his perception; neither does he make his observation absolute. The thrush's song is a cry that negates the "bleakness" - its music dispels the gloom and ushers in the possibilities of a new age.

  1. Thomas Hardy and His Works.

    Thomasin's cousin Clym Yeobright, a diamond merchant in Paris, returns to Edgon, intending to become a schoolmaster. He falls in live with Eustacia, and she marries him, hoping to induce him to return to Paris. But to her despair he will not return; his sight fails and he becomes a furze-cutter on the heath.

  2. Comparative Study - Jane Eyre and Tess of the D'Urbervilles.

    higher power 'fate has out-manoeuvred me' yet later on rebuking it 'God has given us, in a measure, the power to make our own fate'. This contrast highlights for both the characters and the reader the unpredictability and unsure feelings associated with fate.

  1. How does Hardy use setting in "Tess Of The d'Urbervilles" in order to portray ...

    persona within a page long description, he has also used other, much shorter techniques in order to convey Tess' atmosphere, making it less obvious he is talking about her surrounding rather than her present mood. In phase the 1st, just before the end of chapter 2, Hardy describes Tess' setting (including the people surround her)

  2. Contrast the descriptions of Flint comb - Ash and Talbothays, showing How Hardy uses ...

    This indicates that his first impression of Tess is that he is sexually attracted to her. Alec then tries to charm Tess by pushing strawberries into her mouth and pressing roses into her bosom. These fruits of love are an indication of Alec's sexual desire for Tess as he preys upon her innocence.

  • Over 180,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work

Marked by a teacher

This essay has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the essay.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the essay page.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review under the essay preview on this page.

Do not show me this again

Are you in the right place?

Jump to Thomas Hardy and see how teachers think you should prepare in: