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Tess of the D'urbervilles - How far do you agree that Tess is responsible for herown suffering?

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Introduction

From your reading of the novel How far do you agree that Tess is responsible for her own suffering? Tess Of The D'urbervilles was written in 1891 where Tess lived in a male dominated society where money gave you power. Having read the novel, Tess has come across as a very confusing character. Many things happen to her, some of which she is responsible for and some that are due to fate. I will be addressing both sides of the argument, given explanations and quotes and then I will make a conclusion of whether Tess is responsible for her own suffering or if other people had an effect on her life. During the novel we will see a difference in Tess's character and how different issues such as love have influenced her. In chapter 2 Hardy compares Tess with the surroundings of Marlott "The sun blazes down upon fields as large as to give an unenclosed character to the landscape. " An unenclosed character gives us the impression that something's hidden, not visible like Tess's character. Our first impressions of Tess is that she comes across as not a very confident character and Hardy helps us see this by painting a picture in our minds "landscape painter" and gives us strong knowledge of Tess. ...read more.

Middle

Tess feels that if she goes to see the d'urbevilles it might make her feel less guilty for what she did though her parents take advantage of Tess, and her being a weak character lets this happen. We know that Tess isn't a very confident character and she can be a bit shy so its no surprise to us when we find out that she doesn't really want to see them and doesn't know what to expect. "Well I killed the horse mother, I spose I ought to do something" Also In this chapter this is the first time Tess and Alec meet. She is not experienced and is reluctant to anything he does. Alec tries to manipulate Tess by feeding her strawberries and we can tell that Tess feels very uncomfortable with this behaviour. Her weakness is very obvious to Alec, which gives him more power though throughout this chapter we begin to see Tess forming a small fondness towards Alec. In chapter 11 Tess is on the journey with Alec. We can tell that Tess feels really uncomfortable around Alec as he keeps on suggesting uncalled for comments " Tess why do you always dislike me kissing me" Thought this chapter Alec makes a lot of other comments and goes to kiss Tess. ...read more.

Conclusion

must not for certain reasons and Tess became very upset and told the vicar she didn't like him " Then I don't like you" Tess gave the baby a Christian burial herself " the baby was carried in a small deal box" the baby was buried in a "shabby corner of Gods Allotment where he lets the nettles grow and where all anabaptised infants and the conjecturally domed are laid" This gives us the impression that where the baby was buried was a neglected corner but Tess was happy as it was in a churchyard so it was obviously holy and that's what Tess wanted. A proper burial. In this chapter we can tell that Tess has developed greatly and that she is more confident and has learnt a lot by this. Chapter 56 is where everything in the novel builds up. Tess kills Alec and we find that Tess's character is strong for the first time and she knows what she wants. We can see a change in her character and how she becomes more independent and thinks about herself a lot more. Tess has a outburst of anger and does everything for Herself. She is hanged for the murder Of Alec and we feel sympathy for Tess because during that short amount of time where she is with her true love Angel, we know that her happiness is going to end. ...read more.

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