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The banquet scene in Act III of Macbeth is a great contribution to the play as a whole

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Introduction

Haley Titus Titus 1 Mr. Kile February 26, 2003 AP English The Banquet Weddings, funerals, parties, and other social occasions are often included in novels and plays. These scenes reveal values of the characters and society in the work. The banquet scene in Act III of Macbeth is a great contribution to the play as a whole. The behavior of a monarchy and social classes was apparent. " You know your own degrees, sit down ... Ourself will mingle with society... both sides are even; here I'll sit in the midst" as the "lady keeps her state." ...read more.

Middle

Scene III in Act III is the literary climax of scene III and was Macbeth realizing the consequences that were to come for his actions and destruction. " There the grown serpent lies, the worm has fled," the astonished Macbeth exclaims to the first murderer. Macbeth, to seem a good host, contradicts himself by seeming to want " our country's honor, roofed, were the graced person of our Banquo present; who may I rather challenge for unkindness than pity for mischance." After Banquo's ghost enters and places itself at the head of the table, Macbeth announces he sees that " which might appall the devil." ...read more.

Conclusion

This realization of the lords that Macbeth is losing his power is a great contribution to the book as a whole. This foreshadows the remainder of the play. The literary climax of scene III was Macbeth realizing the consequences that were to come for his actions and destruction. The realization of the Lords that Macbeth was growing weak was an extremely important contribution to the book. The Banquet scene allowed us to see the division in social classes and the functions of a monarch society of that time period. Overall the banquet scene revealed to us the values of the characters and society in the work along with its contribution to the book as a whole. ...read more.

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