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The Battle of the Somme was a complete waste of Time………………

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Introduction

The Battle of the Somme was a complete waste of Time.................. I disagree, although the loss of life in the Somme was tremendous, I don't think the Somme was a complete waste of time. It did accomplish its original aims - relieving the French at Ver Dun, pushing the Germans back. The Battle of the Somme started on July the first of 1916 at 7:30 am. It was the idea of a man called Sir Douglas Hague. It was formulated with the goal of relieving the French at Ver Dun. Ver Dun was an area that held great significance to the French and they would defend it no matter what. Hague thought that if the British were to attack a point on the German lines then they would draw troops to defend it, draw troops from Ver Dun, relieving the French and giving them a chance to recover and regroup. ...read more.

Middle

The idea was that because each time it would hit a few feet in front of the last shot it would not miss any thing. This works well in theory, but the problem came when the initial aim was out. More often than not the gun would hit no-mans land, making huge craters that would fill with water and be large enough to drown a man. Also the shots would often hit a few feet either side of the barbed wire, not actually destroying it. Finally, and probably most importantly, is that the artillery didn't kill nearly as many enemy soldiers as it was supposed to. This was because the Germans had much better trenches than the Brits, with much deeper, concrete covered dugouts, which when the shelling started, they climbed into and didn't come out of for a week. ...read more.

Conclusion

Of coarse it was not all bad. Firstly, the battle gave the British a chance it use the tank for the first time and although it wasn't entirely successful this time it was later used to great affect and still is now. Also the Somme allowed the British to gain a total of 10 km into what was previously German space. Also, although the British losses were great the German losses were still considerably higher in the end. In conclusion, I think the battle of the Somme was not a complete waste of life. I believe there were a lot of casualties - more than there should have been but it did help us to win the war in the end. I do believe however that if the plan had been more 'fine tuned' then the campaign would have been eve more successful for fewer lives lost. ...read more.

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