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The context of the play in Ibsen's 'A dolls house'

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Introduction

The context of the play in Ibsen's 'A dolls house' This play focuses on the way that women are seen, especially in the context of marriage and motherhood. Torvald, in particular, has a very clear and narrow definition of a woman's role. He believes that it is the sacred duty of a woman to be a good wife and mother. Moreover, he tells Nora that women are responsible for the morality of their children. In essence, he sees women child-like, helpless creatures. The perception of manliness is also discussed, though in a much more subtle way. Nora's description of Torvald suggests that she is partially aware of the lies inherent in the male role as much as that of the female. Torvald's conception of manliness is based on the value of total independence. He hates the idea of financial or moral dependence on anyone. Tied to the discussion of men and women are the frequent references to Nora's father. ...read more.

Middle

Charged with the fever of the 1848 revolution, a new modern perspective was beginning to emerge in the literary and dramatic world, challenging the romantic tradition; it is Ibsen who can be credited for mastering and popularising the realist drama derived from this new perspective. His plays were both read and performed throughout Europe (in numerous translations) like no other dramatist before. A Doll's House was published and premiered in Copenhagen. His success was particularly important for Norway and the Norwegian language. Freed from four centuries of Danish rule in 1814, Norway was just beginning to shake off the legacy of Danish domination. A Doll's House was written in a form of Norwegian that still bore heavy traces of Danish. Ibsen deliberately chose a colloquial language style to emphasize the theme of realism. Ibsen quickly became Norway's most popular dramatic figure. One of the most striking and oft-noted characteristics of A Doll's House is the way in which it challenged the technical tradition of the so-called well made play in which the first act offered an exposition, the second a situation, and the third an unravelling. ...read more.

Conclusion

Ibsen referred to this version as a "barbaric outrage" to be used only in emergencies. In large part, Ibsen was reacting to the uncertain tempo of the time; Europe was being reshaped with revolutions. The revolutionary spirit and the emergence of modernism influenced Ibsen's choice to focus on an unlikely hero�a housewife�in his attack on middle-class values. Each new generation has had a different way of interpreting the book, from feminist critique to Hegelian allegory of the spirit's historical evolution. The text is simply that good. At the time this play was written and first performed it was revolutionary. However, if it was played today and written as a new play it would not have the same impact. A storyline of this nature, when a women runs off to start a new life and had previously been involved in corruption, could have just as easily appeared in a storyline for a soap opera such as 'Eastenders' and would have fitted in as an exiting, but not revolutionary, story line. Therefore, I have come to the conclusion that it does not have the same impact on Audiences as it first did. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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