• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The descent into savagery in lord of the flies.

Extracts from this document...


????????????????????????????? ???????????? ????? In lord of the flies there is a traceable descent from civilisation into savagery. It starts with rules being ignored and cruelty towards unfortunate members of the group and ends with death and the burning of the island. In the beginning the boys are very civilised jack marches hi boys around the island and a democracy is formed when Ralph is elected to be chief and jack agree to have 'rules, lots of rules and anyone who disobeys will be punished.' this already shows his willingness to hurt and punish but also shows that he believes that rules should be made and obeyed. This system works until Jack realises that he is not above these rules and when not given he conch he shouts 'bollocks to he rules!' he is already defying the rules and probably inspires others to do the same. He shows that if he didn't make the rules or he doesn't agree with them then they are stupid and he doesn't have to follow them. ...read more.


When Simon is killed the boys are described as 'one organism' in their dance with this in mind we can see that the boys probably just reacted to the 'thing in the forest' as being the beast but they did have enough time to realise that it was Simon not a beast. However we cannot completely forget that there was a storm and it was dark but how they failed to notice the difference between a small boy and a beast we can only guess at, but one of them must have had an idea that it was in fact Simon not a beast from the top of the mountain. Only Ralph seems o show remorse or sadness at Simon's death saying "we killed him" and piggy seems to want him to forget about it and protect him and the 'littleuns'. When piggy is killed jack is said to have ' thrown a spear with full intent of killing at Ralph' there was no remorse and he doesn't seem to realise that what he did was wrong and he shouts at Ralph 'see they do what I tell them to do.' ...read more.


The chase throughout the island and stopping at nothing to destroy his enemies shows a kind of madness, which we often see in dictatorships. We can see this chase as a way of revenge on Ralph for becoming chief and the way of 'cleansing' the island of anything Ralph had anything to do with. But he fails to realise that by burning the island he is sealing the others to death as he has destroyed all of his food sources and killed the pigs as pointed out by Ralph who says "the fools don't they realise they've burnt the fruit trees what will they eat tomorrow?" Now without these they would not live for long before they would die of starvation. Luckily for him the navy saw the fire, which is ironically Ralph's idea of getting attention. The descent into savagery can therefore be traced right to the beginning of the book with the jealousy of Jack and the unwillingness to obey rules shown by Jack. To the eventual loss of all rules and democracy and the rise of a dictator and the systematic destruction of all that oppose him. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

A good response that considers the key points; I would like to see further analysis of setting as it is very important symbolically in this novel. Points should also have been made in more detail in order to demonstrate an in depth understanding of the text and the characters.

4 Stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 19/06/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Compare and contrast Defoe's Robinson Crusoe with Golding's Lord of the Flies.

    4 star(s)

    In both of the above books they find and make living areas, they capture wild animals to make a farm and they both are religious. A further modern example of the 'Castaway' plot is in TV shows like 'Big Brother' or other situations where a group of people is stranded

  2. 'Lord of the Flies': Simon Essay.

    In an epileptic fit he dreams he is talking to the head, whom he calls 'The Lord of The Flies' in this conversation the pigs head tries to tempt Simon into joining Ralph and Jack in their feast of the sow, "they think your batty" the beast tries to persuade Simon by criticising him.

  1. Lord of the Flies Essay: Importance of Ralph

    Symbolically, Ralph's failure to remain civilised and to lead a democratic society shows the failure of mankind to recognize or deal with the force of evil inherent in itself. The mind of Ralph also seems to be a step ahead of those belonging to the others.

  2. Explore the Significance of Simon's Death in Lord of the Flies.

    His view is backed up again in Chapter 8 when he has his conversation with the pigs head, this conversation confirms to him that the beast is really inside everyone but shows that most would rather have fun 'than' worry about things.

  1. Significance of the beast in 'The Lord of the Flies'.

    So as we can see form this he is on the verge of insanity. The head starts telling Simon truthful things to hurt him for example 'they think your batty, you don't want Ralph to think your batty do you?

  2. In what ways does Golding present the boys decline into savagery?

    When Piggy is killed by the dislodged rock the conch is also smashed. This is very symbolic in that the conch represented the values of democracy, responsibility and order, ideas which Piggy persistently upheld. The final hunt in the novel is the hunt for Ralph.

  1. "Discuss William Golding's use of symbolism in 'Lord of the Flies'".

    The events in the book, correspond with the weather. Also another thing to be noted is the fact that the weather is never described has sunny/nice weather whenever Jack is there. Jack is the evil character within the book, and the weather reflects it.

  2. How does Golding present the theme of savagery and civilisation in "Lord of ...

    Also, he carried ?a sharpened stick? and ?trailed? it behind him suggesting his intention was to kill. He was also naked apart from his ?tattered shorts held up by his knife belt?. We get the impression that Jack is focused on hunting and is also presented in a primitive way.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work