• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Dramatic Effectiveness of Act 3 Scene 4 - The Banquet Scene

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Dramatic Effectiveness of Act 3 Scene 4 The Banquet Scene Dramatic effectiveness is the writer's use of technique in their writing in order for the audience watching a production to have a greater experience through occurrences on the stage. Through dramatic effectiveness a writer can create brilliant atmosphere and depth to their work. This dramatic effectiveness is thickly portrayed in the play Macbeth where Shakespeare uses the technique skilfully in order to create extremely tense and frustrating scenes for the audience, which heightens the atmosphere for the viewer. Act 3 Scene 4 starts extremely tensely and the audience is immediately thrown into the drama and excitement. Macbeth holds a banquet in celebration of his coronation as King of Scotland. Macbeth is polite to his guests and is very cool, in this way he deceives them and hides the wickedness he broods as he welcomes them humbly, 'You know your own degrees, sit down; at first and last, the hearty welcome' withholding from them the truth about Banquo's disappearance and his absence from the banquet. ...read more.

Middle

It is Macbeth's apparent good spirit to want Banquo to attend the banquet, yet in reality the audience knows that this is purely to cover up his dirty deed, which makes this so satirical. Macbeth's fear is seen as he becomes hysterical and panic stricken as the ghost of Banquo mystically appears and sits in his seat. He then speaks to the ghost, 'Thou canst not say I did it; never shake Thy gory locks at me!' Macbeth has already seen a dagger earlier in the play, he know believes he sees the ghost. Why he sees the ghost is a result of his guilt and remorse for what he has done. All these emotions have been brewing inside him and are released in the form of Banquo's ghost. In the theatre it is difficult to portray emotions such as guilt, as strongly as was needed in Macbeth. As a result Shakespeare uses the ghost as a second medium so that it is easy for the audience to feel this emotion and experience his fear and guilt. ...read more.

Conclusion

Let the earth hide thee! Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold; Thou hast no speculation in those eyes Which thou dost glare with.' Lady Macbeth tries to cover up her husband assuring the Lord's that there is nothing to fear, 'Think of this, good peers, But as a thing of custom. 'Tis no other, Only it spoils the pleasure of the time.' Lady Macbeth realises that the situation is only worsening so beckons the Lord's to leave. The atmosphere cools as the tension is calmed by the Lords departure from the stage. This signals the end of this tense scene leaving Macbeth and Lady Macbeth frightened and panicked. This scene is one of the most tense in the entire play due to the techniques used by the writer, his uses of imagery, imagination and his creativity. The use of mediums such as the ghost of Banquo to get across the characters deepest expressions is a good method of harnessing the fear and anxiety in an atmosphere and this makes this scene so tense and exciting. Duncan Spalding ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Macbeth section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Macbeth essays

  1. How does Shakespeare create dramatic tension in these scenes?

    obviously adding to the thought of his possibly deranged state of mind. In this part spoken by Macbeth, there is an extreme repetition of sleep, the word itself is repeated seven times in total. In addition, Shakespeare uses a series of metaphors for sleep, conjuring up the thought that Macbeth

  2. Macbeth (Analysis of The Banquet Scene)

    It is the first formal occasion that they have to host and they are keen to make a good impression. Macbeth is at the head of the table and tells his subjects to 'know your own degrees' and 'sit down', making his authority known, and reminding the Lords who he is.

  1. The staging of 'Macbeth' Act 3 scene 4 (the banquet scene).

    blank masks and this will look slightly disturbing, but it will also show that in this production and particular scene the lords and others have no real identity, and to show that Macbeth feels as if they are constantly watching and observing his every move, as if they know the truth, which makes him extremely nervous.

  2. Macbeth Act 2, Scene 1~2, How does Shakespeare create dramatic tension in these scenes?

    However, Macbeth has made an enormous error. He has brought the daggers from Duncan's chamber, that according to the plot must lie with the grooms. Lady Macbeth is furious with his mistake, marked by Shakespeare in the rhetorical interrogative, "why...bring these daggers from the place?"

  1. Free essay

    Act 3, Scene 4 (The Banquet Scene)

    It's ironic though because as the murderers entered Macbeth was trying to present himself as a leader in control. And even when Macbeth seems to have order established again something else happens, he can't control the banquet so how can he control a country.

  2. By the end of Act 3, Scene 4 (the Banquet Scene), Macbeth is in ...

    The supernatural element also taking place in Lady Macbeth's soliloquy of calling upon evil spirits to give her power to plot the murder of Duncan without any remorse or conscience. "Come, you spirits...unsex me here and fill me...of direst cruelty...come to my woman's breasts for gall", her soliloquy shows that

  1. How does Shakespeare make the banquet scene dramatic for the audience?

    tries to keep a low profile with quick frantic conversation that adds dramatic tension. The conversation of sin and guilt between Macbeth and the murderer are dramatic and the audience would be intrigued by the nature of the exchange of words.

  2. Consider the dramatic significance of Act 3 Scene 4, 'The Banquet Scene', with reference ...

    As such, the banquet hall is well lit and the hall is filled with guests and slaves. Also there is bear bating in a characterisation of line 100, 'Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear'. This is proof of the greater artistic license that Polanski's version has, as they can even have live animals on set.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work