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The dream is an essential part of the lives of George and Lennie. Explore how the power of the dream is presented in one other part of the novel. Use examples of the language the writer uses to support your ideas. (24)

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Introduction

The dream is an essential part of the lives of George and Lennie. Explore how the power of the dream is presented in one other part of the novel. Use examples of the language the writer uses to support your ideas. (24) Lennie?s insistence on talking about the dream with George while they are playing cards in the ranch house opens up another discussion in which George, similarly to the previous parts of the text, where George?s voice begins to grow warmer and Lennie encourages George to continue recalling the dream excitedly. The first instance in which the dream is seen as an essential part of their lives is when Lennie ?[drums] on the table with his fingers?, starting a rhythm in which George uses to recall their dream. ...read more.

Middle

George begins to change throughout the text, from his tired nature where he ?sighed? due to Lennie?s ignorance, suggesting that he could ?remember anything if there?s anything to eat in it?, to a gradual build up where George?s is described as ?growing warmer?, an effect that the dream has on him. George suddenly changes his speech from short, sharp sentences to longer sentencing and repetition, showing his own excitement for the dream: ?We gotta get a big stake together. I know a little place we can get cheap, but they ain?t givin? it away? George?s repetition which begins to build up throughout the text indicates George?s increasing excitement of the dream, and the fact that he recalls this from memory suggests that it evidently is an essential part of his life. ...read more.

Conclusion

George?s actions gradually also begin to change, with George described as looking ?raptly at the wall over Lennie?s head?, suggesting the depth of his and Lennie?s connection to the dream, and is later described as ?entranced with his own picture?. The dream is described as powerful throughout the text, and in particular when George and Lennie attempt to recall the dream, describing their situation in the future. There is a constant shift in George?s personality when the dream is recalled, with George sitting entranced and his voice growing warm compared to his usual harsh brittle nature, while Lennie is described as desperate to hear the dream from George. Lennie is also described as watching George ?with wide eyes? whenever George tells him the dream, suggesting that both characters see the dream as an essential part of their lives which they share. ...read more.

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