• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Events in Brutus’s tent

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Danni The Events in Brutus's tent (act 4 scenes 2 and 3) have been considered to be the most exciting and engaging episode of the play Julius Caesar written by William Shakespeare. This is because the scene is an emotional roller coaster, it starts with an argument between Brutus and Cassius which slowly builds to a climax where the two finally reconcile. Then the drama builds again through the announcement of portias death and the arrival and departure of Caesar's ghost. The variety of events keeps the audience on the edge of their seats one minute and crying with emotion for Brutus the next. However Despite the tension and high drama in this scene I think that Act 2 Scene 1 is more engaging because of the supernatural goings on and the spooky appearance of the conspirators. The beginning of the scene is very dramatic, the scene has changed from Rome this will get the audiences attention. There are drumbeats in the background that build up tension. In the previous scene Anthony was preparing for war which was quite dramatic for the audience and then a quick change of scene with a dramatic start will have been very exciting for the audience. ...read more.

Middle

Cassius brings the Drama to a climax by offering Brutus his dagger and telling him to cut out his heart out. "There is my Dagger and here my naked breast;" Brutus cannot keep up the disapproval of Cassius and laughs at Cassius. "Sheathe your dagger Be angry when you will, it shall have scope; Do what you will, dishonor shall be humor." This shows that Brutus cannot stay angry for too long and this is a big release of tension for the audience. When Brutus and Cassius embrace they are very emotionally generous. Brutus even goes as far as to mention his heart. This will be very moving for the audience as well as a huge release of tension after all the arguing. The poet's meddling is a good comic relief and releases more tension. But this also shows that Brutus is quite impolite as he dismisses the poet for trying to help him. Just as the audience is feeling relaxed and happy again, Brutus confides in Cassius about portias death making the atmosphere dramatic again, Brutus Confides in Cassius to explain to him why he was angry, "Oh Cassius I am sick of many grief's" When Titinius and Messala enter, giving news of Anthony and Octavius back in Rome this reminds the audience about what is going on and brings the audience back to the present. ...read more.

Conclusion

We see Brutus being unsure of what he is doing again because he does not see him self as part of them, "they are the faction" Everything about the conspirators is dramatic like the way they are out very late at night in a storm. Also Cassius is a sort of ringleader because he organized it but Brutus is respected more by the conspirators and compared to Cassius Brutus is the voice of reason and holds more power in the plan. For example when Cassius wants to kill mark Anthony Brutus persuades the conspirators not to, "For Anthony is but a limb of Caesar" When Portia enters it is dramatic because we know something that the character doesn't. Also we see another side of Brutus, while he is trying to hide the conspiracy, he doesn't like upsetting her he flatters her. "Good Portia go to bed" He acts worried about her, "It is not for your health thus to commit Your weak condition to the raw cold morning." Eventually he agrees to tell her what is going on later. All this is different to the strong and valiant conspirator Brutus, here we see him as a loving husband. In Conclusion, Both scenes are Very powerful and effectively dramatic but despite the emotional roller coaster in Act 4 scenes 2 and 3 in my opinion Act 2 scene 1 was more dramatic and engaging for the Audience. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Julius Caesar section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Julius Caesar essays

  1. What do we learn about the characters of Cassius and Brutus in these scenes, ...

    On the whole the most important apprehension made on Caesar's part is when he wisely notices that Cassius is very discontented with his position, when he says, "Such men as he be never at heart's ease whiles they behold a greater than themselves."

  2. Julius Caersar - Analysis of Brutus

    This shows that Caesar would not die without Brutus' stab. Caesar realizes that there must be a noble reason for this assassination if Brutus was in it. This again shows how much Caesar respects Brutus. Brutus and Caesar both respect each other, but in different ways.

  1. Refer to Act 1 Scene 2, Act 2 Scene 1 and Act 4 Scene ...

    With this encouragement Cassius launches into a deep speech persuading Brutus that Caesar should not be in control since he is physically weak. Cassius tells Brutus about two events that show how weak Caesar is. The first is about a time where Caesar challenged him to swim across the flooded river Tiber on a stormy day.

  2. What do we learn about the characters of Cassius and Brutus and how they ...

    draw Brutus to his side with the implication that they are one and that they are fighting the same cause, against Caesar. Such use of language is very effective, further showing the persuasiveness of Cassius to the audience. Cassius' use of anecdotes is also quite persuasive, especially where he likens Caesar to a "sick girl" to ridicule him.

  1. Discuss Brutus' and Marc Antony's characters

    not that good at it and he did not show it that well. But this also helps Caesar' and Antony' cause and shows the Plebeians that Brutus' accusations against Caesar were false. Antony says that Brutus was an honourable man fifteen times in the same speech, using the phrase in an increasingly sarcastic manner.

  2. What do we learn about the characters of Cassius and Brutus in these scenes, ...

    This rebellion had been foiled. For these reasons the play has been made a philosophical study about the tensions between friends who held power, and the possible effects in the plot were to succeed. When we first encounter Cassius in Act I Scene ii the audience will begin to comprehend Caesars perception of him.

  1. By comparing and contrasting the dramatic presentation of Act 3 Scene 2 in the ...

    tears and weep, rejoice and joy, valiant and valour. Brutus asks certain rhetorical questions to ensue the crowd's support. He uses alliteration such as 'base, bondman' and 'rude, Roman' (L.27-29) to make the words sound harsher, and the way he 'pauses' for their reply gives them the impression that he actually cares about their opinions.

  2. Explain how the audience's perception of Cassius and Brutus is likely to change during ...

    The first reaction we get from Brutus is disagreement, but slowly Cassius works on him and at the end Brutus reluctantly agrees. The first method Cassius uses is to soften Brutus up. This achieved by making Brutus feel guilty. This can be seen on line 33 when Cassius says: "I

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work