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The extract given below is from Act 1 scene (i) of the play Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

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Introduction

English Literature Monthly Test Answer Question 1 ? Julius Caesar The extract given below is from Act 1 scene (i) of the play ?Julius Caesar? by William Shakespeare. In this extract, two tribunes, Flavius and Marullus try and Flavius try to prevent the people of Rome, who are gathered in the streets from celebrating Caesar?s victory over Pompey and his sons, as well as the feast of Lupercal. This extract is also important because the character of Julius Caesar is introduced by a cobbler, who is a mere commoner in Rome. In this extract, there are very few people speaking dialogues. We have Flavius and Marullus, the two tribunes, as well as two commoners. The two tribunes talk to the commoners, asking two what their professions are. The second commoner, does not answer directly, but uses the power of rhetoric to tell the tribunes what his work is, frustrating them. The conversation that follows is dominated by the tribunes. ...read more.

Middle

The extract is the opening scene of the play and fits this title very well. This extract foreshadows the important themes and issues that may come up in play, by introducing them, but very slightly. We see how powerful the tribunes are in Rome, because, the two tribunes, Flavius and Marullus, have command over the commoners, and have the ability to make sure that all their questions are answered. We also see that the power of rhetoric is used to great effect. The cobbler uses this power of rhetoric to confuse the tribunes as to what his art is. Since the play was then performed in theatres and heard by people, many of the words spoken by the cobbler can easily be confused for other words of the English Language, e.g. ? ?awl? for all, and ?soles? for souls. Marullus uses it to convince the people not to support Caesar, because he has defeated another great general of Rome. ...read more.

Conclusion

Tradition can also play a tremendous part in determining the outcome of the play, because even Marullus stops before disrobing Caesar?s images, as it is the Feast of Lupercal. There is also a public and a private attitude seen in Marullus and Flavius, as when they are with Caesar, they are very supportive of him, but outside they do not bother about speaking their mind. This can also be important thing in the play, because Caesar will have to work hard on figuring out which one of his tribunes, and followers can be against him. Ambition can also be seen to be an important part of this play, because Caesar is shown to overpower Pompey, just to prove to people, that he is stronger than other people, and above all of them. Politics in Rome is also seen as a big issue in this extract. This extract shows that a lot of generals fight for people?s support, and when they gain it, they start to exploit it. These are the many ways that this extract foreshadows the many themes and issues that could arise in the play ?Julius Caesar?. ...read more.

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