• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The extract given below is from Act 1 scene (i) of the play Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

English Literature Monthly Test Answer Question 1 ? Julius Caesar The extract given below is from Act 1 scene (i) of the play ?Julius Caesar? by William Shakespeare. In this extract, two tribunes, Flavius and Marullus try and Flavius try to prevent the people of Rome, who are gathered in the streets from celebrating Caesar?s victory over Pompey and his sons, as well as the feast of Lupercal. This extract is also important because the character of Julius Caesar is introduced by a cobbler, who is a mere commoner in Rome. In this extract, there are very few people speaking dialogues. We have Flavius and Marullus, the two tribunes, as well as two commoners. The two tribunes talk to the commoners, asking two what their professions are. The second commoner, does not answer directly, but uses the power of rhetoric to tell the tribunes what his work is, frustrating them. The conversation that follows is dominated by the tribunes. ...read more.

Middle

The extract is the opening scene of the play and fits this title very well. This extract foreshadows the important themes and issues that may come up in play, by introducing them, but very slightly. We see how powerful the tribunes are in Rome, because, the two tribunes, Flavius and Marullus, have command over the commoners, and have the ability to make sure that all their questions are answered. We also see that the power of rhetoric is used to great effect. The cobbler uses this power of rhetoric to confuse the tribunes as to what his art is. Since the play was then performed in theatres and heard by people, many of the words spoken by the cobbler can easily be confused for other words of the English Language, e.g. ? ?awl? for all, and ?soles? for souls. Marullus uses it to convince the people not to support Caesar, because he has defeated another great general of Rome. ...read more.

Conclusion

Tradition can also play a tremendous part in determining the outcome of the play, because even Marullus stops before disrobing Caesar?s images, as it is the Feast of Lupercal. There is also a public and a private attitude seen in Marullus and Flavius, as when they are with Caesar, they are very supportive of him, but outside they do not bother about speaking their mind. This can also be important thing in the play, because Caesar will have to work hard on figuring out which one of his tribunes, and followers can be against him. Ambition can also be seen to be an important part of this play, because Caesar is shown to overpower Pompey, just to prove to people, that he is stronger than other people, and above all of them. Politics in Rome is also seen as a big issue in this extract. This extract shows that a lot of generals fight for people?s support, and when they gain it, they start to exploit it. These are the many ways that this extract foreshadows the many themes and issues that could arise in the play ?Julius Caesar?. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Julius Caesar section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Julius Caesar essays

  1. In William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar", honour is displayed as a main theme throughout the ...

    Cassius then gets Pindarus to kill him using Cassius' sword. Cassius dies in honour of his friend. But when Cassius is about to die he says, "Caesar, thou art revenged even with the sword that killed thee." Caesar has taken one of the main conspirators.

  2. The exact date of the publication of 'Julius Caesar' is not absolutely certain. However, ...

    On a simple level it means that Brutus and Cassius have argued - not a good sign. However, it could also allude to the mistake that Brutus has just made by deciding that they should march to Philippi rather than wait for the enemy to come to them.

  1. Write an analysis of character and language in these scenes. Relating it to the ...

    One of the first mistakes Brutus makes is he bases his whole speech on his honour. He tells the crowd to believe and agree with everything he says because he is an honourable man. This is not a strong line of defence or persuasion because it is hard to believe

  2. Show how Shakespeare demonstrates the use of persuasion with close reference to the play ...

    of character says that Mark Antony is 'so belov'd of Caesar' (II.I.156) and he suggests that 'Antony and Caesar fall together' (II.I.166) However, Brutus overrules and persuades them that he does not need to be murdered, and Cassius does not argue with his decision.

  1. Explore the ways in which leadership is presented in the play 'Julius caesar'

    At this point Shakespeare makes it clear to the audience that Antony has appealed to the crowd's better nature and has successfully won them over. Also when Cassius sends Brutus the forged letters claiming that they are from the plebeians, Brutus is utterly convinced that the plebeians also believe that eradicating Caesar will be for the public good.

  2. How suitably is the theme of the supernatural depicted in the play 'Julius Caesar'?

    "civil strife in heaven," "Or else the world, too saucy] with the gods, / Incenses them to send destruction" this suggesting that Caesar's actions are causing strife in nature, a widely held belief at the time to be proof that something must be wrong.

  1. Using Particularly Act 3 Scenes 1 & 2 and Act 4 Scene 1 How ...

    He says: 'Mark Antony, here, take you Caesar's body You shall not in your speech blame us, But speak all good you can devise of Caesar And say you do' t by our permission; Else you shall not have any hand at all About his funeral;' The one thing that

  2. Using Particularly Act 3 Scene 1, Act 3 Scene 2, and Act 4 Scene ...

    When he shakes their hands, he calls out each of their names, and this is manipulative, as he makes a point of letting everybody think that he is talking directly to them - therefore making them trust him more. "That one of two bad ways you must conceit me, Either a coward or a flatterer."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work