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The first chapter of the novel, The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is effective in establishing the characters

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Introduction

´╗┐The first chapter of the novel, The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is effective in establishing the characters for the remainder of the book that the problems in society are related to the sinful nature of man and good versus evil. In Golding's first chapter, the main characters are introduced, we see signs of the beginning of rivalries, issues and concerns are portrayed which are to continue throughout the rest of the book. Golding introduces the three main characters in the first chapter individually. Ralph, the main protagonist, is tall with fair hair and is introduced first. His attitude when first realising there are no grown-ups around is excitement, and he is looking forward to the prospect of being free of adults. In contrast, the second character to be introduced, Piggy, "was shorter than the fair boy and very fat". These two complete opposites are introduced into the situation very early on. Jack, the last main character to be introduced, is described by Golding as "tall, thin and bony. His face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness." Jack is the only other character who is close to Ralph. ...read more.

Middle

Many of the characters, especially Jack do not respond well to Piggy's intelligence: "You're talking too much shut up fatty". This is just one remark from Jack in response to one of Piggy's ideas. From this opening chapter, we can start to see the intelligence behind this shy and reserved fat little boy, and the trouble his brains might cause. Jack is probably the last important character to be introduced. Golding describes his silhouette as a "creature" from a distance, with his black length coat looking incredibly menacing. Jack is described as "tall, thin and bony; and his hair was red beneath the black cap. His face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness". The first words that come out of Jack's mouth are orders that are barked to the rest of the choir. He is portrayed as relentless and unforgiving when Simon faints: "Leave him alone he?s always throwing a faint". This shows he does not care for the others, and has no sympathy for other human beings, compared to Ralph, he is the complete opposite, and is not a good listener and it is obvious he jumps into action without thinking. ...read more.

Conclusion

Through his descriptive language, Golding uses and phrases such as "witch-like cry", "smashed into the jungle" and "climbed over a broken trunk" to emphasise the not so prefect nature of this tropical island by using negative description. In all three of these phrases, the impact is great. We are able to understand after studying the text that these descriptions are all clues of the menacing and negative situations that are to come. Even the use of the term "scar" to describe the rocks and setting leaves a negative impact, as scars are related to pain and the permanent remainders of wounds. Throughout this chapter, Golding continues to use words with negative connotation such as attacking, decaying, coarse and even the sweat and the heat on the Island is unbearable. In conclusion, we can see that the first chapter of the novel, The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is effective in establishing the characters for the rest of the book. We have learnt about the main characters and started to see the development of their personalities. Through Golding's use of language we have picked up many negative signs, and have learnt of concerns facing the boys stranded on the island this shall continue to grow and develop throughout the rest of the novel ...read more.

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