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The first scene of Othello explains some of the more important themes that will be developed later in the play some of the main themes are racism, jealously and hatred, most of these are towards Othello.

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Introduction

Othello The first scene of Othello explains some of the more important themes that will be developed later in the play some of the main themes are racism, jealously and hatred, most of these are towards Othello. Othello begins on a street in Venice, with an argument between Roderigo and Iago, Roderigo has feelings for Desdemona and been paying Iago to help split her up with Othello so he can be with her, but Roderigo learned that Desdemona has married Othello, a general whom Iago begrudgingly serves as his assistant. Roderigo is annoyed with Iago because he paid him to split them up and that he hasn't " tush never tell me, I take it much unkindly that thou Iago who hast had my purse." This scene shows that there will be lots of deceit and corruption in the play. ...read more.

Middle

Iago admits that he isn't what he appears to be ''I am not what I am'' this makes the audience realize that Iago can't be trusted and will only do things beneficial to himself. Iago is often funny, especially in his scenes with the foolish Roderigo, which serve as a showcase of Iago's manipulative abilities, he constantly lies during the play and he doesn't care who he hurts as long as he gets what he wants, the first impressions of Iago the audience gets is that he is a sly person who will only look out for himself this idea is developed until the end of the play. Iago can be seen as the most powerful person in the play because he can manipulate everybody. In the opening lines of the play, Othello remains away from much of the action that affects him. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is jealousy that prompts Iago to plot Othello's downfall he is jealous that Cassio got the promotion and he didn't, Iago use Othello's jealousy to destroy him, he creates the impression that Desdemona is having an affair with Cassio in order to stir the jealousy within Othello. It is this jealousy and the ignorance of Othello that lead to the death Desdemona. Iago noticed Othello's tendency overreaction but not even Iago imagined Othello would go as far into jealousy as he did Othello takes everything he sees and everything he is told at face value without questioning it, this is perfect for Iago it means that he can tell Othello anything and he will believe it. The theme of jealousy is present throughout the whole play in the opening scene Iago is jealous of Cassio, Roderigo is jealous that Desdemona chose to marry Othello instead of him, through out the play sexualised jealousy turns quickly into hate and leads to death. ...read more.

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