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The four poems "A Birthday" by Christina Rossetti, "To the Ladies" by Mary Chudleigh, "First Love" by John Claire, "Wandering Song of Aengus" and Shakespeare's sonnet "130" all have one thing in common, that is their poetry presents love

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Introduction

Examine the Presentation of Love And Marriage in 5 or 6 of The Pre-1914 Poems That We Have Studied. The four poems "A Birthday" by Christina Rossetti, "To the Ladies" by Mary Chudleigh, "First Love" by John Claire, "Wandering Song of Aengus" and Shakespeare's sonnet "130" all have one thing in common, that is their poetry presents love, however the poets share different views. Shakespeare's sonnet "130" was written in the 16th century. He talks about how his love is not beautiful, "My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun" and "Coral is far red than her lip's red." Shakespeare throughout the poem excluding the last two lines writes the poem in this negative manner and in doing so it is felt Shakespeare is almost making a mockery out of the hyperbolic comparison which was very popular in Shakespeare's time. Shakespeare talks realistically about his love, "If snow be white why then her breast are dun;" "If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head" The one quote in the sonnet that really makes the sonnet seem as if Shakespeare is putting his love down for the time it was written in is ...read more.

Middle

The last two lines of this poem "Because the birthday of my life is come, my love is come to me." This essentially is trying to justify why she wants such exotic and expensive textures, because the love of her life is like all the parties and gifts are all in one, in him and so she feels so good and like a queen. The third poem "To the Ladies" is almost totally opposite to the poem "Birthday". The poem was written in the 17th century and Chudleigh shows a real desire to get across to women why they should not marry, "Wife and servant are the same", "Like mutes, she signs alone must make", "But still governed by the nod". Chudleigh also describes marriage as "The fatal knot" and "That wretched state". There is no direct reference to love in this poem and I feel this is because Chudleigh feels love is not true; there is no such thing as love. Mary Chudleigh is telling the reader that women are the property of their husband, "Him still must serve, him still obey." ...read more.

Conclusion

However when put into the context of "I ne'er was struck before that hour with love so sudden and so sweet," it seems here that Clair is presenting this word at which first seems negative into a powerful positive impression, as the word "Stuck" gives the reader a feeling of how beautiful this woman was and so he was not able to move because he was admiring the sight. Even though we get these words which cannot be completely branded as negative words we do get phrases that emphasise how love is a great feeling to experience. Phrases such as "I never saw so sweet a face," "With love so sudden and sweet" and "Her face it bloomed like a sweet flower." These phrases all seem to be positive because they are describing the experience of love as a good one. However there is some contradiction shown by the Clair against his own positive thoughts, "is love's bed always snow," which suggest love can be cold. So the poem first love is one with many variations of the experience of love, the poem almost says love is a good, cold, happy and even a sad experience. ?? ?? ?? ?? Zayn Mushtaq English Coursework -1- ...read more.

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