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The Great Expectations of Four Characters in Dickens' novel.

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Introduction

The Great Expectations of Four Characters in Dickens' novel. Great Expectations is a novel on the uselessness of great hopes in a world of conflict. It is also the story of the orphan boy, Pip, of his relatives, of Estella, of Miss Havisham, and of Magwitch. Many characters in the books have great expectations of their own which contrast with those of other characters. Pip, the protagonist of the novel wants to become rich and noble, while his adoptive father, Joe Gargery, wants him to be a blacksmith. Pip also wants the money he receives to come from a noble source, Magwitch, his source of money, is instead a convict. ...read more.

Middle

He rejects all snobbery while Pip desires it. He wants Pip to become his apprentice. He doesn't see why Pip would want anything other than what is set for him. On the other hand, Pip is fascinated by the luxury of Miss Havisham's world, and is finally attracted to it because of Estella. Thus, Joe's expectations for Pip contrast with Pip's desires. Pip's expectations, that his money come from a noble source, are incompatible with those of Magwitch. Magwitch is a convict. As Magwitch, he is persecuted, as Provis, he makes a fortune. In making Pip a gentleman he hopes to experience through him a life he hasn't lived. ...read more.

Conclusion

Pip quickly falls in love with Estella and believes Miss Havisham has destined her to him. Miss Havisham was abandoned on her wedding day and hates all men. She raised Estella to be the weapon to achieve her revenge. Miss Havisham takes advantage of Pip's ignorance of the source of his expectations; and uses him as an object. Dickens once again shows we aren't living in a fairy tale where all our wishes come true, life is different. The world of Great Expectations, just like in our world, is one where the great expectations of the many characters come into conflict with one another. Dickens gives the reader many examples of how it is useless to hold hopes since we are all different, and thus think and reason in different ways. We are many, and have many different interests, which hardly ever match with those of others. ...read more.

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