• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Heart Of DarknessRemind yourself of the passage from the beginning of chapter 1 as far as "...under the stars", and discuss its effectiveness as an opening to the novel. In the course of your answer:

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Heart Of Darkness Remind yourself of the passage from the beginning of chapter 1 as far as "...under the stars", and discuss its effectiveness as an opening to the novel. In the course of your answer: * Look at the effects of the writing in the passage; * Comment on how methods and concerns of the novel are introduced here. We are immediately led into a slow and calm description of our surroundings by an almost invisible character unknown to us and the company on board this boat. I can only presume it to be Conrad himself, but it immediately shows us how mysterious Conrad's writing can be and what is to come, is not something of child's reading, but rather an in depth, thought provoking novella that will lead us to think much about many things. We are on this boat, "The Nellie" waiting for the tide to turn so that we can start out on a journey of some kind. This is a good start as this is an introduction to our journey that is of Marlow's to Africa, and also of ours through the story. ...read more.

Middle

This sets the mood of the scene. We have been given descriptions of the scene, but a boring gloom seems to set the mood. We are also told that this gloom hangs over "the greatest town on earth" meaning London, so that we know where we are. Conrad then goes on to describe who is on the boat waiting for this tide to change. It is interesting that Conrad starts the story on a boat, as pretty much the entire novella takes place on boats and so this is quite a good introduction to getting the reader used to what a boat looks and feels like. "The Director of Companies" is said to be staring out to sea, however, his place was in the gloom behind him, presumably in London. This makes us wonder why he is on a boat being described as a "pilot" which is the epitome of trust to every sailor. The Lawyer is sitting on a rug and cushion because of his "many years and many virtues". This I believe is basically saying that the Lawyer is of a considerable age compared to the rest and therefore some comfort is given to him rather than the wooden boards of the boat. ...read more.

Conclusion

This again is hinting at death to come further into the book. The waters around the men also experience a change and become "less brilliant" than before. I can only imagine this to mean that the water no longer reflects the rays of the sun and therefore is less interesting, and instead becomes a plain blank, black lagoon of unknown depth. This could relate to Africa being the black unknown which Marlow is yet to journey into. Conrad tells us how the waters have memories of great explorers such as "Drake" and "Franklin". These explorers could be a way of Conrad hinting to us that they remain memories and that the journey we are about to take, or the crew on this boat is about to take, is fated and they will become merely memories. He describes the explorers as "the germs of empires". This interesting opinion shows us that Conrad resents the white men colonising Africa as they spread like germs, like a plague upon the earth, devouring cultures to change them to their own. If people didn't change willingly then the white men saw an opportunity to make money by using them as cheap labour and so black slaves were born. ?? ?? ?? ?? By Anthony Eastman 12, O ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Joseph Conrad section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Joseph Conrad essays

  1. The Heart of Darkness Marlow's story of the Roman Conquest of Britain as an ...

    Marlow describes the behavior of the Roman soldiers during the British conquest. He says " the conquest of the earth, which mostly means the taking it away from those who have a different complexion or slightly flatter noses than ourselves, is not a pretty thing when you look into it

  2. Heart of Darkness. Discuss the variety of ways in which the title of ...

    some of what he would have considered horrors at the start as just normal and facts of life. This is clearly shown in Marlow's views of the natives' heads on sticks outside Kurtz's station. He realises the true horror and brutality of what Kurtz has been doing, and although Marlow

  1. Explore the themes of justace and things not being as they seem in The ...

    Shepherd Fennel is the only character that doesn't change. He starts off happy because he is having a party for the christening of his second girl and even at the end once they had chased the third stranger he is sympathetic to Timothy Summers, saying to the constable that he

  2. Discuss The Title Of Conrad's Novel 'Heart Of Darkness'.

    Meanwhile, this is constantly contradicted and contrasted with the references to the "gloom" which emphasizes the darkness and all this symbolises in London. This builds up a dark feel, and a mysterious yet relaxed tone, leaving the audience a bit confused as to which description or meaning they should be believing.

  1. Heart of Darkness - Through a detailed analysis of a passage of your choice ...

    The ellipsis here merely reinforces the mysticism that surrounds the novel and its characters, for the sentence remains incomplete and incomprehensible with no meaning. Presumably Kurtz would have continued to produce some proclamation or express some profound sentiment, but 'there was nothing more', and so the character of Kurtz remains

  2. Discuss the Theme of ‘Darkness’ in ‘The Darkness Out There’ and ‘The Red Room’

    A number of events have happened there, including the crash of a German plane during the war, and thus it is marked as a haunted place. This, perhaps, is key to the rest of the story. Even in the bright sunshine, the darkness still lies there close by.

  1. The perfection of a short story lies in the symbiosis between content and form. ...

    if she hadn't been there; she was part of the performance, after all." (334). She dreams the life she would like to live, but despite her own opinion she does not belong to the other visitors, and when it becomes obvious "what other people actually think of her, Miss Brill's

  2. Comparing "The Darkness Out There" by Penelope Lively, with "The Black Veil" by Charles ...

    Coming out on a dangerously cold winters evening to find help just shows her deep worry. We may also sympathise with Kerry Stevens 'In The Darkness Out There' as Sandra doesn't like him at first, she thinks that he 'isn't up to much' and would rather be going to help Mrs Rutter with "Susie" or "Liz".

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work