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The Hound of the Baskervilles.

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Introduction

The Hound of the Baskervilles Arthur Conan Doyle lived in London in the late 19th century. His career was not exactly very successful in the early stages of his life. It started as him being a doctor onboard a ship, he was then a general practitioner in Southsea, but this career did not work for him either, and later he became an unsuccessful optician! So Doyle made the decision to dedicate himself to writing. Undoubtedly his most famous works are the adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Watson. They were loved by all the public, who made Holmes a cult figure. When people read Doyle's books it allows them to think that they live in a world rid of crime and violence, a safe place with no criminals and murderers nothing like the London in the late 19th century. The novel was written in 1902, the main plot of it is that many years before a member of the Baskerville family, Hugo Baskerville, had beaten a young lady and had kept her in the house as his prisoner. ...read more.

Middle

The most important link is that to the 'phantom' hound, and especially the eyes. "Its eyes glowed with a smouldering glare." There is a strong link to the Gothic genre with the mention of "phosphorescent eyes." There is a stereotypical set of characters, the hero, the trusty sidekick, the damsel in distress, and of course the arch-villain (black-sheep). It is all very melodramatic. The hero is Sherlock Holmes, who is very clever and is always right. The sidekick is Dr Watson, who isn't that clever, and tends to get things wrong. The damsel in distress is Stapleton's sister (actually Stapleton's wife). The arch-villain is no other than Stapleton himself. It follows the traditional structure of a Victorian tale, with all the stereotypical characters, and all is resolved at the end of the novel. However, we do not know what happens to Stapleton in the end. We presume that he gets lost in the Grimpen mire and dies, but the author does not tell us what actually happens to him, to end the novel in suspense. ...read more.

Conclusion

Much the same style and language is used in other novels of Romantic period of Literature; Mrs Radcliff's "Uldopho", Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein", some elements in the Bront� novels, Edgar Allen Poe's "the Murders in the Rue Morgue", Melvyn Peake's "Titus Groan". In conclusion, all of the elements I have discussed so far contribute in creating a perfect setting and a dark, mysterious and dangerous atmosphere. Doyle makes this story a frightening horror story by using strong descriptive language and the use of imagery, this is a very clever and simple way of creating an enormous effect on the reader because they imagine they are in the story and can therefore experience the suspense and thrill in a first person view. This story was very effective when I read it, I especially liked the end few chapters where the suspense and atmosphere were peaking. This book really pulled me into the story and made me feel as though I was one of the people in the story, and all of these events were happening to me. This is why I think this book is so very effective in creating a powerful setting and atmosphere. ?? ?? ?? ?? Abhishek Singh 11DHH Page 1 of 2 ...read more.

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