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The House of the Spirits - Isabel Allende

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Introduction

Carolina Resk House of the Spirits Composition Ms. Viegas Throughout the novel, "The House of the Spirits," we find many elements of Magical Realism. Like many Latin American writers, Isabel Allende uses this type of literature which is a combination of the real with the magical. The book is based on Clara's (protagonist) journals in which she writes all the occurrences that happen in her life and therefore the book becomes a testimony of the events that took place in the time. Fate also takes a very important role in the novel. Chance or strange twists of fate recur repeatedly in The House of the Spirits. ...read more.

Middle

Moreover we can include to this magical atmosphere the way spirits and ghosts are always present in the story. They become part of the family, of the history. One scene that can be cited is when Ferula's spirit comes to say good-bye in the big house on the corner. "...Ferula appeared, silent and with a distant expression on her face..." We are dealing with ghosts and spirits that come and go from the house every second, but it is seen as an usual thing. This is due to Clara's interest in communicating with spirits. She openly converses with them, and Jaime and Nicolas are "... the only members of the family who lived completely removed from the three-legged table, protected from magic and spiritualism.." ...read more.

Conclusion

Her clairvoyance contributes to this mystical ambiance and makes the book intense and at the same time magical. Due to Clara's clairvoyance fate change repeatedly in the novel because it allows her to understand peoples' fates and to predict the future. Although Clara realizes that she can only predict but not change the future, fate is not entirely arbitrary. Rather, each character's fate is the result of all of their actions, of their ambitions. Each of the romantic couples in the novel meets apparently by chance at a young age and years later realizes that things were meant to be. Concluding we can affirm that the subtle integration of the supernatural with real compose a satisfying and fulfilling book to read. Various elements of magical realism are found in this compelling novel among other intense themes that are presented by Isabel Allende. ...read more.

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