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The Importance of being Ernest in the eyes of an old a love struck vicar, Reverend Canon Chasuble.

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Introduction

The Importance of being Ernest in the eyes of an old a love struck vicar, Reverend Canon Chasuble. For a man of my age it was all rather energetic and I am only now starting to get my head around it all. Whether his holiness will look upon the events of the past few weeks as good and proper time will only tell, but now I now I have a busy few weeks ahead of me, crammed with a christening and two weddings, Oh gosh the excitement of it all! The pieces of this mad jigsaw are only now slipping into place. It all started to me with a short afternoon stroll to the residence of one Jack Worthing. I should disclose now in the safety of my diary I knew full well that he was visiting a rather troublesome and most unreligious brother in the City of London. ...read more.

Middle

His good name was therefore protected in the country and one does best not to think of the immoral situations he must have used this corrupt charade for. Algernon, a close troublesome friend of Mr Worthing, took advantage of the immoral situation and participated in this whole act of deception himself to suffice his own ends, to meet the charming girl I have met many times, Mr Worthing's ward the young Miss Cecily. I believe that I am right in saying that this youngster who goes by the name of Algernon and moves in all of the correct London Social circles for his age is well practiced in the art of deception, but it could be that the intellect is failing me. Anyway he took the role as Ernest Worthing, Mr J Worthing's fabricated brother. Algernon's charm worked well on a girl who was already beset with this fictitious character and they were engaged within the hour. ...read more.

Conclusion

It turned out that Mr Worthing was not in fact Mr Worthing at all. His Guardian, a good friend who is now sadly deceased, adopted Mr J Worthing at a very young age due to a terrible mix up. Misplaced by his maid, the dear, dear Miss Prism who has since been plagued with overwhelming feelings of guilt, he was found and looked after very well. Well it turns out that in an incredible twist of fate that Mr J Worthing was in fact christened with the name of Ernest after his father who he sadly never knew. Well it turns out that Algernon is the brother of Jack and aunty of Lady Bracknell, how god works in baffling but fantastic ways! Well now the excitement has died somewhat and I have slipped well back into my customary series of naps. I have two weddings to organise and christening to arrange for one Master Algernon. The mere thought of this sorry episode is making me rather heavy-eyed... ...read more.

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