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The Influence of Reality in Fictional Writing

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The Influence of Reality in Fictional Writing By: Kate Young February 10, 2005 "The reason that fiction is more interesting than any other form of literature, to those who really like to study people, is that in fiction the author can really tell the truth without humiliating himself," states Eleanor Roosevelt (Roosevelt). Everyone faces difficult and embarrassing situations in their lives. Some choose to acknowledge these occurrences, and others choose not to face them. No matter the degree to which someone faces and realizes their difficulties, these circumstances will influence the way someone views certain situations, the opinions they form about their perfect hero, their own morals and what they consider the most important character traits. Occasionally, an author will write intentionally relating different characters to his or her self; however, other times past occurrences will influence the values and characteristics a writer will instill in his or her characters. Charlotte Bronte's writing demonstrates that she lived a difficult life, facing certain hardships that influence characteristics and morals like Jane's in her novel, Jane Eyre. ...read more.


"Madame, these top knots, I repeat, must be cut off; think of the time wasted, of--" (Bronte 136).Mr. Brocklehurst is a cold hearted man who believes that the girls in his school should be raised humbly, and yet he raises his own daughters extravagantly, dressing them in silks and false curls, while he demands that the tight braids the school girls wear are inappropriate and must be cut off. The men in Bronte's life influenced the morals she valued in her idea of the perfect man. In Jane Eyre, John Reed represents Bronte's only brother Branwell, whose father spoiled him, exactly as John Reed's mother indulges him. "He would do very well if he had fewer cakes and sweetmeats sent him from home, but the mother's heart turned from an opinion so harsh." (Bronte 123). John Reed does not learn to become independent, therefore when he becomes older, he falls into self-destructive habits, ruining himself and losing his family's fortune. ...read more.


She certainly achieved her goal of creating a heroine as little and small as herself, because Jane is certainly little and small, but proves herself to be just as worthy as anyone else, overcoming difficulties and prevailing in standing firm in her own morals and ideals. Certainly Jane Eyre contains many aspects of Bronte's life, from character representation, to actual events such as a typhus breakout at Lowood, to the basis of Mr. Rochester on her brother Branwell. Some authors base their fiction on their own personal lives, nearly writing autobiographies, but others do not plan to share their lives in their writing. All experiences in life affect the way people react to and view certain situations, influence their moral faith, and can come out through different forms of art. However much Bronte meant to base the novel Jane Eyre on her own personal life, there were certainly many things that influenced the story and characters. When these things about Bronte are learned, they make the story all the more enjoyable for the reader. ...read more.

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