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The Inspector is an "Embodiment of a collective conscience." How successful is he in making the characters accept responsibility for Eva's death?

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Neel Joshi English Assessment The Inspector is an "Embodiment of a collective conscience." How successful is he in making the characters accept responsibility for Eva's death? The Inspector is a great character in this play and the quote in the title said by Gareth Lloyd Evans sums him up. Basically the Inspector is a character that draws emotions and most importantly the truth out of people. He makes the other characters realise their conscience, this is a unique but distinctive quality in a character. The word "Inspector" suggests a person who searches in great detail at a person or thing. The Inspectors name "Goole" sounds a lot like the word "Ghoul" which means ghost or someone who is interested in death. The Inspector confirms the word pronunciation similarities by knowing what will happen to Eva. The Inspector also shows a dominating role over the Birlings and Gerald, he over powers their minds with his unique technique, making them grow to believe that it was their entire fault that Eva died. ...read more.


"But just remember this. One Eva Smith has gone but there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smith's and John Smith's" saying this has made the Birlings and Gerald think about what they do in the future and taught them not to be as harsh on their friends, employees or workers. The Inspector also has an enormous affect on the structure and pace of the play, he moves the play forward there is some evidence of this on page 22 of The Inspector Calls. "Sometimes there isn't as much difference as you think. Often, if it was left to me, I wouldn't know where to draw the line." As the inspector lectures this to the Birlings and Gerald he is ending one topic discussion and preparing himself for another. The Inspector is also a great creator of long and dramatic pauses, which generates extreme tension. ...read more.


The first time we hear of the Inspector entering is in page 10. "We hear the sharp ring of a front door bell. Birling stops to listen." This also has a contrast with the previously mentioned point about the Inspector creating tension; in this particular situation he builds the tension by visiting the Birlings house at such a late hour. The Inspectors exit from the play is also a great point that shows all of the characteristics and manners that he has, being acted out. In this speech he makes the audience feel as if they have just seen a crime and what the Inspector was saying is hitting through to them too, they also feel that they know it is not enough to act in a "proper" manner too. I think the Inspector is a very mystical and suspicious character in the play, I also think he is a vital character and J.B. priestly has invented the story revolving around him. Neel Joshi ...read more.

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