• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"The Lamb", "The Tyger", "Hawk Roosting" and "The Jaguar",

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Page1 William Blake and Ted Hughes From the titles of "The Lamb", "The Tyger", "Hawk Roosting" and "The Jaguar", it seems that these poems are about annimals but it quickly becomes apparent that they are in fact much more than simple descriptions. Annimals are symbols which describe metaphors about Man. Blake uses a wide variety of poetic forms in songs of innocence and experience. Hughes (1930-1996) believes man thinks he is God compared to all other creatures, in connection to this, he wrote a poem called "Hawk Roosting." "Hawk Roosting" consists of the whole poem being in first person- a hawk's eye view of the world. The hawk takes himself to be the exact centre of creation, assuming that trees, air, Sun and Earth were made for his convenience. "The convenience of the high trees", trees being the hawk's habitat and "the air's buoyancy and the Sun's ray", thermals for him to fly in. He then says "are of advantage to me", meaning they were made for his uses. In contrast to this, Man believes the earth is there for his advantage. ...read more.

Middle

The aspects of nature are beyond man's understanding and they look in awe and wonder at the Jaguar. They are scared at the jaguar but also have admiration for the creature. William Blake (1757-1827) is the more biblical out of the two poets. He wrote two famous poems which linked together: "The Tyger" and "The Lamb". "The Lamb" is a traditional symbol of innocence. It is also the animal of sacrifice, therefore resembles innocence. A child is innocent, harmless and has no experience. "Gave thee such a tender voice"~ has the voice of a child. Innocence does not need clothing, just as a baby can be naked, "softest clothing, woolly, bright" the lamb has no artificial clothing. The lamb is often used in the Bible, especially in the New Testament, where Christ is the lamb of God, offered as a sacrifice to attone for the sins of mankind. Adam and Eve were innocent in the Garden of Eden with the lamb being God's love. When they ate the apple they became like "The Tyger", knowledge leading to power, with God's anger throwing them out of the garden. ...read more.

Conclusion

Blake wrote this poem at about the time of the industrial revolution. This was a dark and gloomy time with pollution and an over-crowded population. "What the hammer? what the chain?" is in contact to all the machinery in the industries. It asks the question "Who do you think you are, to think that you can make something as unique as me with your machines?" In "The Lamb" and "The Tyger", Blake questions the origins of both animals and enters into a dialogue with the animals: "who made thee?", "in what furnace was thy brain?" In both poems, the question is rhetorical as he answers it (in " "The Lamb") with the line "little lamb, I'll tell you thee: he is called by thy name, for he calls himself a lamb". This leads the reader to the pure innocence and love that exists in the creation of one animal that "is called by thy name". In "The Tyger" Blake appears to be (I) questioning the very reason as to why God made such a creature. "Did he who made the lamb make thee?" and (II) inviting the reader to consider this when comparing it with God's other creations. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Blake section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Blake essays

  1. The Analysis of William Blake's 'The Tyger and the lamb'.

    The emphasis on the whole stanza is on the fact that no human could be good enough, powerful enough to create something so perfect. 5th Stanza: When the stars threw down their spears, And watered heaven with their tears, Did he smile his work to see?

  2. Following A close study of "Tyger Tyger" by William Blake and "Hawk Roosting" by ...

    The poet feels that the hawk is strong and focused as is shown on the third line "Inaction no falsifying dream". This means that the hawk doesn't need dreams as his life is perfect the way it is. The poet also feels that there is a sense of menace or

  1. Compare and Contrast 'The Lamb' and 'The Tyger' by William Blake

    'In what furnace was thy brain?' Here lie connotations with the devil. The word furnace can be linked with the fire metaphor that is constant throughout the poem. It provokes images of death and destruction, which are all qualities that can be linked with the devil.

  2. Investigating Language Change Over Time

    This is the story that I wrote using the key words. The sounds I'm concentrating on are highlighted, however the copy Derek read from did not have any highlighted words. The little boy and his cat. One day the little boy decided to buy a cat.

  1. The Tyger" and "The Lamb" are often 2 poems paired together and I think ...

    by looking at the slight alteration between the first and sixth stanza( Could and Dare)The poem draws our attention to the fact that the world contains conflicting elements: ferocity, strength gentleness, peace - these elements all being present in God.

  2. William Blake 1757-1827

    These lyrics-fresh, direct observations-are notable for their eloquence. In 1794, disillusioned with the possibility of human perfection, Blake issued Songs of Experience, employing the same lyric style and much of the same subject matter as in Songs of Innocence. Both series of poems take on deeper resonances when read in conjunction.

  1. Compare the ways William Blake in 'The Tyger' and Ted Hughes in 'The Jaguar' ...

    But he knows it could only be G-d that could create such a mighty creature, Julia Lee 'Without contraries, there is no progression'. 'What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry?' He suggests the animal was formed with the skill of workers and blacksmiths and when they had

  2. London Before The Great Fire.

    Subsequently, Jane told Samuel that three hundred houses had been destroyed and the Fire was near London Bridge. This made Samuel decide that he should go out and check that his house was not in danger. Pepys hired a boat to travel on the Thames.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work