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The lord of the flies - How important are these two chapters to the novel as a whole?

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Introduction

How important are these two chapters to the novel as a whole? Chapters eight and nine are vitally important to the novel as a whole because they convey the difference in the way Jack is presented in this section of the novel and the earlier part. During these two chapters we learn about the killing of the sow, this is a significant event and is described in elaborate detail. Jack is a natural born leader but his methods are the natural opposite to those of Ralph. Jack is dictatorial and aggressive. He also has a strong desire to lead and he asserts himself through his prowess as a hunter, which then deteriorates into a desire for lust for killing. Jacks character portrays how certain people can revert to primitive desires and actions without the restrictions imposed by adults. As the story unfolds Jacks character changes however this change is one of degeneration as a public school boy descends into a more primitive life. Jack has little or no patience with constructive positive things, which is one of the reasons why he grows tired of debates and hut building. His love and passion of hunting stems from the sense of power killing gives him. ...read more.

Middle

The force of destruction which is presented by Jack triumphs over the controls and restraints of civilisation represented by Ralph. Throughout the book Jack plays a significant role but within this section his character changes and appears to be molded by his inner evil self. This is a message that is conveyed constantly throughout the novel that everyone has evil within them which may only surface under given circumstances. Once that evil has been released it can cause terror, pain, destruction and in some cases as happened on the island death. Simon is a significant character in these two specific chapters. During chapter eight he enters the jungle alone 'Simon has passed through the area of fruit trees but today the littluns......had not persued him there' This is when Simon retreats into his private den where he is surrounded by nature. This is a peaceful place of solitude where Simon can sit and think. Simon sits and contemplates and can understand the decline into savagery that is taking control of the boys and this is his place of safety where he feels comfortable away from the others. Whilst he is in the jungle Simon meets the lord of the flies. ...read more.

Conclusion

Simon chooses to reject the 'beast' and continues to search for the truth. However when he finds the truth it only results ion his death and this is not the outcome he expected. Now that the boys have killed Simon they do not know that the beast is imaginary. There is no one on the island now who knows the truth about this beat. Some of the boys, for example Piggy, have their suspicions about the reality of the beast, but non have the knowledge or the truth. Simon is rejected and slaughtered in a ritual frenzy. He represents the martyr who is neither valued nor understood by his society. The arrival of the dead parachutist gives the boys a physical form for the beast. In reality he is just a soldier killed in war. The moving, decomposing corpse is gruesome but there is nothing supernatural about it. It takes its place in nature, along with the flies, but is finally claimed by the sea. What Golding is trying to portray is the undeveloped evil which does exist in all humankind. This is the real beast. In the novel is an example of how, in the right circumstances, the beast will reveal itself and bring about corruption. ...read more.

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