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The Misery in Evil - "To hate and fear is to be psychologically ill...it is, in fact, the consuming illness of our time.

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Introduction

The Misery in Evil By Ashik Kabir "To hate and fear is to be psychologically ill...it is, in fact, the consuming illness of our time. -H.A. Overstreet There is a lot we can learn from infants. Infants have control over their emotions. When they feel hungry, they cry. When we feed them, they stop. They react the same way when dealing with such feelings and emotions such as nausea, sleep, and even anger. The children know how to let their emotions flow and as soon as the emotion is dealt with, they let the feelings go. As life becomes more complicated, people tend to forget how to let thing flow and then let them go. The older we get, the more we hold in the emotional baggage, allow ourselves to be possessed by them. ...read more.

Middle

He treats Heathcliff as one of the servants and terminates his education. The hatred is spread into Heathcliff as he vows to seek revenge on Hindley. While Hindley continued his abuse on Heathcliff, Catherine falls in love with the orphan child. However, Catherine had a personal ambition to find someone that would carry her away like an enchanted princess. She got this opportunity when she was allowed to enter the Linton house. Heathcliff, on the other hand, was told to go back home. While Catherine learned the ways of the rich, Heathcliff started his plan to seek revenge. One of the interesting aspects of the book is the fact that Heathcliff started off with the typical romantic hero. ...read more.

Conclusion

Heathcliff's ultimate revenge would take place by destroying the love between Hareton and the young Catherine. He tried to recreate a love triangle between his son Linton Heathcliff, the young Catherine, and Hareton. However, the young Catherine reminded Heathcliff of his love for her mother so much, that his desire to fulfill his act of revenge soon disappeared. When he finally realized this, his anger, his rage, turned to misery. Like his love before him, he let the misery take over, which would lead him to his own death. Heathcliff, along with many other characters in the story, were locked inside a cage they couldn't escape. The lock was composed of love, hatred, revenge and misery. For the second generation of children in the story (Heathcliff, Edgar Linton, Hindley, and Catherine), the self-made prisons made for some very miserable lives and depressing deaths. ...read more.

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