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The most significant theme in the novel "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding is the degeneration from civility to savagery. Sub themes to this novel would be power and

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Introduction

Savagery, Power, and Fear The most significant theme in the novel "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding is the degeneration from civility to savagery. Sub themes to this novel would be power and the fear of the unknown. In this novel William Golding depicts the importance of having rules and regulations even in secluded islands. Without any order total destruction will occur. The boys' lack of laws caused abuse of power and fear. Control of inner self, power, and fear are essential for a civilized society. All the boys on the island have degenerated from civility to savagery. "The rock struck Piggy a glancing blow from chin to knee; the conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist" pg 200. ...read more.

Middle

"'Well then' All at once he found he could talk fluently and explain what he had to say. He passed a hand through his fair hair and spoke" pg 30. Ralph depended on the conch to maintain his leadership. Ralph wanted to work together and have a democratic society. He as much possible thought of ways of getting off the island. Jack on the other hand wanted everyone to follow and obey his rules. "Conch! Conch! Shouted Jack, we don't need the conch any more. We know who ought to say things. What good did Simon do speaking, or Bill, or Walter? It's time some people knew they've got to keep quiet and leave deciding things to the rest of us-" pg 110-111. ...read more.

Conclusion

'But there isn't a snake,' Ralph says" pg 35. Ralph tries to convince the boys that there isn't any beast. Jack tells them that there is a beast and he will kill it. William Golding's novel has no beast wandering on the island except for the beast within man. The fear of the beast is actually the fear of themselves. The degeneration from civility to savagery is the most dominant theme in this novel. Power and the fear of the unknown also play an important part in this work of fiction. The boys were innocent when Ralph was in power. When Jack began gaining power he spread fear to the boys and taught them how to be savage. "Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood!-" pg206. Soon after most of the boys followed Jack and became him. Their savagery ways, abuse of power, and play with fear caused total ciaos on the island. ...read more.

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