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The novel "Of mice and men" is classed by some as John Steinbeck's best novel.

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Monday, 27 January 2003 Sam McDevitt English Literature Coursework The novel "Of mice and men" is classed by some as John Steinbeck's best novel. It portrays the tale of two friends, Lennie and George, and their voyage towards the goal of owning their own farm. Their journey runs parallel to the American dream, the dream that, that's perception varies from people to people. The dream that promises freedom, work and happiness. Steinbeck illustrates the downside to the dream, the way it can go horribly wrong. People from all walks of life hold the American dream in high regard. It promises to accept all hard working folk. The general belief of the dream is similar from man to man but people see a different goal at the end of their journey. This idea has a huge impact on American society. Citizens of America and abroad alike feel encouraged to work hard by the dream. The gift of "the statue of liberty" from the French relates to the American dream and symbolises the effect it had and has on the world. ...read more.


Candy was eventually persuaded to have his dog shot by the rest of the workers. But for the rest of his life, he wished he'd have "relieved" the dog of its duty. Just as candy was, he was discarded Crook's was the only black man on the farm and suffered due to his crooked spine caused by a horse kicking him when he was young and by racist views. He was segregated from the white men and slept alone in a barn. He was a proud man and had no time for the others. He got on with his job and kept out of their way. When they crossed his path, he challenged them and said such things as "I aint wanted in the bunkhouse, and you aint wanted in my room". He was banished from playing cards and was very lonely. This explained his reluctancy to mix with Lennie. Crooks' father once told him not to mix with white children, and Crook's was forced by the other workers to believe in his father's opinion. ...read more.


The whole farm began a witch-hunt for Lennie and Lennie was mercifully shot in the back of the head by George as he told him about the farm, and the rabbits. He wanted his "brother" to suffer as little as possible. The other workers discovered Lennie dead, and realised George had done it. They perversely rejoiced and applauded George but he sat and thought. Curley and Carlson could not understand what George and slim were upset about, and this shows the nature of the two men. The couple have a strong link with the title, "Of mice and men". They both have their plans, and inadvertently ruin each other's dream. The early incident in the book when Lennie pets the dead mouse could be considered a prophecy showing he had a mouse's brain in a huge mans body, and never, understood his own strength. Few people ever realise and reach their American dream. The few that do reap the rewards and the rewards are great. The majority of workers, migrants and citizens who have their dream, never make it to the last stop, but many come mighty close, and Lennie and George are just two names, on that long, long list. ...read more.

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