• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The novel shows the downfall from the boys' high class society society into a tribal-like culture of conflict

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐Golding presents aspects of human nature as themes in the book. It alerts us to descend from order to chaos, good to evil, civilization to savagery. They are explored through how evil can be brought out in certain situations, the dangers in not addressing our own fears and the battle between civilization and anarchy.Most importantly, Golding achieved the above using metaphorical and didactic writing techniques that unquestionably shocked his readers - and still shocks them today. "Lord of the Flies" reveals how people can descend into barbarism in an atmosphere of chaos.The main issues in the novel are that of the divide between civilization and savagery, human evil, power and its consequences,.The theme of the breakdown of civilization toward savagery Brings out the struggle between the ruling parts of society. Golding's main Point of the conflict between civilization and savagery is through the characters in the novel. Ralph, the principal character and Piggy are both symbols for motivation and leadership, whilst Jack and his right hand man Roger are symbols for the desire for power, selfishness and not caring for morality and immorality. Jack cannot at first bring himself to kill a pig because of "the disgusting site of the knife going into living flesh; because of the site of blood." This shows the boys' innocence at the beginning. ...read more.

Middle

Even Ralph, the symbol for civilization, morality and leadership joins in the tribal chanting and killing of Simon for he cannot help himself but be part of the mob. After Simon's death, Ralph and Piggy discuss what happened but both desperately try to excuse their actions "It was dark. There was that - that bloody dance. There was lightning and thunder and rain. We was scared! ... It was an accident, that's what it was, an accident." They are denying that they were part of Simon's murder. The disturbing display of savagery when Jack's boys cut off a pigs head, the Lord of the Flies and put it on a stick as an offering for the beast is an important symbol of the theme of an instinctive human savagery. Simon's delirious confrontation with the Lord of the Flies confirms his theory of evil being instinctive to man and actually within all of us "There isn't anyone to help you. Only me. And I'm the beast... fancy thinking the Beast was something you could hunt and kill! ... You knew didn't you? I'm a part of you." Golding is portraying through these examples that every person, no matter how strong their moral instinct will become savage sometime or later. A strong theme throughout the novel is that of power. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is a presage of the incident of Simon's murder. The use of irony in the last chapter of the novel is effective in illustrating the boundary between civilization and savagery. One of Golding's most effective techniques is his use of a character who resolves a complication. As Ralph is escaping from Jack's tribe there is a sudden appearance of a Naval Officer to bring the boys back to the world of law and order. The fire that attracted the attention of the band of naval officers was not a controlled signal fire but a fire with the purpose of killing and burning Ralph as Jack's tribe hunted him. This is an essential message of the novel - the irony is that it was their savagery that ultimately saved them. The irony is deepened by the behavior of the officer. His manner indicates he has never seen such savagery, that he was outraged by the boys. Yet, the man is a naval officer at the very time of the rescues, himself serving in a war zone.The island is a microcosm and these techniques are the tools which provide the reader with a clear insight and an understanding into human nature.War and the time of his upbringing was the context for William Golding's "Lord of the Flies."Through the two wars, the Great Depression, and the Cold war, he was exposed to what mankind is truly capable of. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Explore the various factors which contribute to the downfall of the boys society on ...

    3 star(s)

    dies with him. Jack is the complete opposite of Ralph, in that Jack lives for today, not tomorrow, and would rather have fun instead of being prepared to be rescued. Jack's emphasis on 'fun' leads to the majority of the boys forgetting their age, and even personal details.

  2. Examine the framework of society that is adapted by the boys in “Lord of ...

    Nature on the island is beautiful and yet at the same time it is potentially hostile. The beauty of the island is conveyed through similes, for example: "The lagoon was still as a mountain lake- blue of all shades and shadowy green and purple."

  1. "Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart, and the ...

    The appear of the navy officer at the end of novel gives us a new insight, as C B Cox says, '[The officer's] trim cruiser, the sub-machine gun, revolver and row of gilt buttons, are only more sophisticated substitutes for the war-paint and sticks of Jack and his followers' (C B Cox: p121).

  2. Themes, Motifs, and Symbols - Themes are the fundamental concepts addressed and explored in ...

    The Lord of the Flies may be seen as a symbol for the devil, since it works to promote evil among mankind. Further, because Simon is the character who arrives at the moral truth of the novel, and because he is killed sacrificially as a consequence of having discovered this

  1. At the end of 'Lord of the Flies' Ralph weeps for "the end of ...

    The boys soon begin to realise they can do what they want, "Now there was no parent to fall a heavy hand" This makes things dangerous, especially if they abuse this power they have acquired. Roger really enjoys the power he has.

  2. In an essay about his novel “Lord of the Flies”, William Golding wrote: “The ...

    voting, slowing diminishes from here onwards, even if it is in the simplest of tasks. Quite obviously if all members of the group worked together, things would happen much more quickly and efficiently because on the island some things can not be done single-handedly, "How could I, all by myself?"

  1. Creative Writing

    the shouting... the screaming... It was all coming back to him; How Abby ran out of the park onto the street, blocking the cars... how Abby wailed for him to try to understand her... How his last moment with Abby was when he pushed her onto the floor in anger, just as a truck crushed over her bones.

  2. Both Golding and Dickens have concerns for the moral welfare of their societies. What ...

    How could here be? What would a beast eat?" "Pig" "We eat pig" "Piggy!" And it is Piggy whom they ultimately destroy. The boys do indeed eat the pig and Piggy is destroyed by the darkness within every one of the boys.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work