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The Open Window- Saki (Notes)

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Introduction

The Open Window by Saki 1. Third person narrative 2. Nuttel’s point of view ï creates suspense and tension 3. The cleverness, humor, and ironic effect of "The Open Window" would be lost if the narrator were Vera herself. Themes: 1. Appearance as reality - Vera, Mrs. Sappleton's niece tells a very convincing story to Mr. Frampton Nuttel, she is so authentic in her description that his frame of reality about the family is created through her story. The point of this theme is that what Vera fabricates becomes his belief. ...read more.

Middle

Her imagination is brilliant and overpowering that everyone is tricked by her tall tale. Her quick thinking attitude (?Horror stories at short notice were her speciality.? ) is aided by her imagination to create the disturbing story to Mr. Nuttel. She also deceives Mrs. Sappleton by telling her the reason why Mr. Nuttel runs away when the hunting party comes back. 3. Sanity and Insanity- Frampton Nuttel is in the country for a nervous condition, he questions his sanity after he hears the story from Vera. ...read more.

Conclusion

Symbolism: 1. The most important symbol in ?The Open Window? is the open window itself. When Mrs. Sappleton?s niece tells Mr. Nuttel the story of the lost hunters, the open window comes to symbolize Mrs. Sappleton?s pain and heartbreak at the loss of her husband and younger brother and is a representation of the tragedy. When the truth is later revealed, the open window no longer symbolizes anguish but the very deceit itself. Saki uses the symbol ironically by having the open window, an object one might expect would imply dishonesty, as a symbol of deceit. Atmosphere: 1. Eery, ghostly, anxious Structure: 1. Chronological order 2. Story- within- a- story ...read more.

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