• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The opening scene of "A View from the Bridge" contains a lot of clues and preparations for what is to come in the rest of the play

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does the opening scene of "A View from the Bridge" prepare us for what is to come in the rest of the play? The opening scene of "A View from the Bridge" contains a lot of clues and preparations for what is to come in the rest of the play. By just reading the title, the reader can tell a lot about what events will occur. The opening stage directions suggest the theme of the play before any characters are introduced, which is very significant. The first few lines of each person's speech hints at the type of character that each person is going to be, and many clues are given away to what is going to happen and why. The set can also give the audience some contextual information- by showing what time period it was in. This hints to what the story may lead to because of the particular things going on at this time in America, and also the idea of the American Dream. The title of the play is very significant. As the first thing you read, you can use it to predict/ sum up what will happen in the play. Obviously, you cannot tell from the title exactly what the plot will be, and what type of characters involved, however you do get an idea of the type of play that it is. ...read more.

Middle

The attention that Eddie pays to the way Catherine looks in the first dialogue could be interpreted in two ways, one that he is a caring Father figure being concerned about the way his daughter is dressing and another that there is almost a sexual relationship between them. When Eddie warns Catherine about her "walkin'wavy," he seems jealous like a partner, however he then goes on to say "Katie, I promised your mother on her deathbed. I'm responsible for you." This implies that he is her guardian, a relation, which means that the jealousy and sexual tension between Eddie and Catherine is wrong. This theme of the 'more than uncle-niece' relationship continues throughout the play, and the fact that it is the first thing to be performed on the stage suggests that it could be a key hint to what is going to happen in the play. Eddie's reaction to the news of Catherine's new job is vital, because it is another example of the way Eddie feels about Catherine, and what type of relationship they have. Eddie is very protective, and at first strongly objects to Catherine leaving school to work. When Eddie says: "It's not wonderful. You'll never get a job nowheres unless you finish school. You can't take no job. Why didn't you ask me before you took a job?" shows that he still sees her as a child who is not ready to be released into the world, or make any independent decisions without his permission. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are a few key themes running through the play, for example love and tragedy, and under the theme of tragedy, fate and the inevitable. Miller used these clever links to demonstrate his themes. All of the clues about inevitable tragedy link up at the end, and show how everything that happened in the opening scenes, which were at the time unimportant, made what happened in the future happen. The opening scene uses small but clear warnings, omens, themes and strong words that altogether prepare you for what will happen. The phone booth's presence throughout the play creates a continuous tension as Eddie's desire to discard Marco and Rodolpho by reporting them to the authorities. The same continuous reminder is used with the phonograph- the player that played the song that represents the love between Catherine and Rodolpho that he resents with such a passion. Even if you do not know what is going to happen after the opening scene, subconsciously you are prepared for what is going to happen because of the careful signals that Miller has used. He does this to put his point across even more clearly- creating a bigger impact on the audience because the omens that they have been presented with create a lot of tension. This makes the play constantly tense, and the audience is waiting for the fatal moment, so when it arrives it has a big impact. Madeleine Porter 10NWS - 1 - ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Arthur Miller section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Arthur Miller essays

  1. A View From the Bridge - The whole of this play involves symbolism, on ...

    His appearance; especially his blond 'wacky' hair. Eddie says of Rodolpho: Weber suppressed parita20's functionalism theory. "he's like a chorus girl or sump'n". This work from www.coursework.info His abilities and talents, e.g. dressmaking and cooking, which Eddie thinks are things only a woman should do.

  2. "A View From The Bridge" is a play that deals with complex human relationships ...

    I think that Catherine only fully understands Beatrice's viewpoint after Eddie accuses Rodolpho of being after his papers. One of the giveaways that Catherine hasn't been giving Beatrice much thought is halfway through the play; Catherine: "He said you was jealous?...

  1. 'A View from the Bridge' - review

    Beatrice countenances Rodolfo to go ahead and dance. Catherine takes Rodolfo's hand and he stiffly rises, feeling Eddie's eyes on his back they dance. The tension between the characters can be easily seen in their actions. Catherine's rebellious behaviour is easily visible, when she goes to Rodolfo and takes his hand in her hand and invites him to dance.

  2. In what ways is 'A view from the bridge' like a Greek tragedy?

    Again the action is symbolic of the play's deeper meaning. Reece Ryan 10L Page 4 Eddie literally dies by his own hand, which holds the knife, and is killed by his own weapon, but Eddie also metaphorically destroys himself, over the whole course of the play.

  1. A view from the bridge

    This speech immediately sets up tension between Alfieri, a representative of written law and the Italian immigrant community, who prefer to follow their own 'law'. Alfieri understood Eddies love for Catherine was impossible to control. Alfieri empathised with Eddies in a way Beatrice could not.

  2. A View from the Bridge

    The audience is made to feel a purging of emotions, which is a device known as 'catharsis'. This along with 'pauses' between dialogue and 'dramatic irony', which is when the audience knows more than the characters, creates tension and heightens their sympathy for some characters or heightens hatred for others.

  1. A View From the Bridge

    to his wife and children in Italy; he is a hard-working individual who is powerful and often acts like a leader. The chorus character is Alfieri; he is an Italian-American lawyer and the narrator of this tragedy. He is the chorus character because he speaks directly to the audience and

  2. Relationships between the characters from a central theme in 'A view from the bridge'

    However, the conditions in Italy hadn't improved. During the Second World War America started making weapons and supplied them to Europe to make money. During this period many Italians illegally migrated to America to earn money. The Italians' first experience was at Ellis Island in New York where they had their medicals and paperwork checked.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work