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The play an 'An Inspector Calls' by J.B Priestly has two main themes: the need for individual and social responsibility and the effect of guilt on the individual.

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Introduction

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Middle

All he cares about is getting his knighthood. This tells us he doesn�t care about the people who have responsibilities but only cares about his own privileges. �I told him (inspector) quite plainly that I thought I had done no more than my duty� Birling thinks that when he sacked Eva he done nothing wrong and thinks that was part of his job. Gerald has some guilt for Eva but not as much as Sheila and Eric. �I�m rather more upset by this business than I appear to be� He is trying to say that he feels guilty about what he has done to affect Eva but it is not showing as much as Eric or Sheila. Sheila and Eric seem to be the most affected by the death of Eva Smith they feel it was their mistakes that lead her to suicide. �it was my own fault� Sheila realises that what she did was wrong and fully regrets what she done. She didn�t recognise at the time that it could have led to the death of someone. �I felt rotten about it at the time and now I feel a lot worse� She confesses that she knew it was wrong at the time and that she feels terrible about it now. ...read more.

Conclusion

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