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The play Othello. Act I, scene iii, has basically started all of the drama to come

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Introduction

The play Othello was written by William Shakespeare. It was written during the peak of his career, during the time period of 1600 to 1606. Act I, scene iii, takes place before the military fleet travels to Cyprus. It takes place in 16th century Venice, around midnight in the middle of a street, while Iago and Roderigo are socializing amongst each other. Roderigo has found out that Desdemona and Othello have been wed, and he feels that he is never going to have a chance to be with the lovely Desdemona. He informed Iago that he feels his life has become worthless, and he will not be able to live because of the strong torment by love and by his strong feelings of wanting to be with Desdemona. This passage reveals Iago's true color and his duplicity as a human being. During Iago's narrative, he comes up with his plan of making Desdemona look as if she has cheated on Othello, to break up their marriage. The passage has been built upon the strong tension existing between Desdemona's father, Brabantio, and Othello. ...read more.

Middle

The theme is shown through Iago instigating Desdemona's loyalty as the wife of Othello and to see if he can come up with anything that will make it look like Desdemona has actually not been loyal to Othello. The theme can also be seen as being good vs. evil and appearance vs. reality. With good vs. evil, we have good being Desdemona and Othello and their relationship vs. Iago . With appearance vs. reality we have the appearance being all of the false things Iago is going to try and make of Desdemona vs. reality, being Desdemona has been a faithful wife. The literary device motif is shown through Iago stating how he wishes to make Desdemona the false wife of Othello, in hopes that Othello believes him and all is ruined. The literary devices, dialogue and diction are also used throughout Act I, scene iii. The literary device dialogue is used as Iago and Roderigo are speaking to one another. Diction is also used while Roderigo and Iago are speaking to one another. In this passage, diction is used with dark, evil and commanding words. ...read more.

Conclusion

"...There are many Events in the womb of time which will be delivered" (I, iii, 6-7). This quote from Iago uses foreshadowing by saying that many new events are yet to happen, but all in good time. This foreshadows that Iago has come up with a plan and knows what events are likely to occur. Iago also states:" I have't. It is engendered. Hell and night Must bring this monstrous birth to world's light" ( I, iii, 37-38). This quote also foreshadows how there is going to be a monstrous event, meaning the lie is going to come out about Desdemona being unfaithful and everything is going to slowly go downhill. This passage overall ,with all of the literary devices being used, is quite crucial to the rest of the play Othello. Act I, scene iii, has basically started all of the drama to come, which is going to be continually foreshadowed and shown throughout the rest of the play. Iago being the terrible character that he is sticks with his plan of ruining Othello and Desdemona's marriage, and in the end, Desdemona is murdered by Othello. Othello realizes what he has done, and soon after Desdemona dies, he finds out the truth about everything and ends up killing himself. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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