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The Play within the Play of Hamlet. To try and reveal his Uncle Claudiuss wrongdoing, he puts on a play that depicts the exact seen of the murder but it is unclear if this trick really displayed Claudiuss guilt.

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Introduction

The Starting of the True Mousetrap The novel, Hamlet, describes a story about a nephew who desires to seek revenge on his uncle for his father's death. To try and reveal his Uncle Claudius's wrongdoing, he puts on a play that depicts the exact seen of the murder but it is unclear if this trick really displayed Claudius's guilt. Hamlet believes that this play will show him if what the ghost told him was correct or if the ghost was just an evil spirit. Also this scene shows that Hamlet is just acting crazy because before Claudius shows up, Hamlet is speaking clearly to Horatio and is excited for what the play will reveal. When Claudius arrives, he begins to act insane again. Before the play starts, Hamlet questions Polonius about his acting past. This exchange pokes at the murder of his father and even foreshadows the death of Polonius. The dialogue between Polonius and Hamlet allows Hamlet, though acting crazy, to express ideas about the treachery of both Polonius and Claudius without them truly understanding that Hamlet suspects Claudius killed his father and that Polonius is betraying Hamlet's trust by spying on him and reading his love letters to Ophelia. ...read more.

Middle

The dialogue between Hamlet and Polonius also indirectly referenced both Claudius and Polonius as good actors. Claudius is a good actor because after killing his brother, he is able to go on living like he had no part in that. Hamlet creates this play to truly test how great an actor Claudius truly is. Claudius reacts to the play but not in a way that clearly proves he was the murderer. Claudius stands and leaves the play. Later Rosencrantz states that Claudius "is in his retirement marvelous distempered" (3.2.284). Hamlet is convinced that this means that Claudius was the murderer and the ghost was right. Hamlet states that he will "take the ghost's word for a thousand pound" (3.2.270-271). But it is very reasonable for Claudius to get upset because the story does seem very accusing towards him and much of it shadows his life. This reason is why most of the viewers don't blame Claudius still for the murder but it was enough for Hamlet. Hamlet also alludes to Polonius's acting in the dialogue between them. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also wanted to be able to mourn with her about his father's death but the quick marriage made that impossible and he was left to mourn by himself. Finally, Ophelia denying his love created even a greater sense of hopelessness. Ophelia hurt Hamlet when he returned all his personal belongings and love letters. Hamlet may have acted like he never loved her throughout the novel but his true love showed when he jumped into her grave and shouted, "I loved Ophelia. Forty thousand brothers could not, with all their quantity of love, make up my sum" (5.1.59-261). All this proves that Hamlet was depressed but does not prove at all his insanity. Hamlet's depression was thought to be insanity by many people in the novel but as a reader, it is clear that Hamlet acted insane just to distract Claudius enough so that he could get his revenge. Polonius and Hamlet's conversation prior to the play helps reference indirectly too many aspects of the novel. First, it foreshadows the eventual murder of Polonius because of his wickedness towards the man he was supposed to serve. Polonius had a duty to obey Hamlet but instead he spied and played tricks on Hamlet and that led to his death. ...read more.

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