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The poem's "Nooligan" by Roger McGough and "Street Boy" by Gareth Owen are two poems which both deal with the issue of teenage hooliganism, and both poets use language to create a vivid sense of character.

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Introduction

"Nooligan" and "Street Boy" By Hamza Mush The poem's "Nooligan" by Roger McGough and "Street Boy" by Gareth Owen are two poems which both deal with the issue of teenage hooliganism, and both poets use language to create a vivid sense of character. Although both deal with the same theme, there are many similarities and differences between the two. "Nooligan" is about a boy who thinks he is really powerful and harsh but is actually an uneducated boy trying to be a real hooligan. "Street Boy" is also about a hooligan except that he actually is more powerful and has a higher status than the inferior "Nooligan". One of the main similarities is that both the poets present the characters as using slang language or some sort of incorrect form of english. In "Nooligan" for example the boy says in the fourth line of the third verse: Football's me game (Well, watchin') ...read more.

Middle

"Nooligan" uses ABCBD while "Street Boy" uses ABCB. The only difference is the last line of "Nooligan" which is in parenthesis and doesn't rhyme or fit with any of the other lines. I'm the boss (Well, one of them) Roger McGough has done this deliberately to make the last line stand out, gives an anti-climax effect. That last line creates humor in the poem and shows the true personality of the "Nooligan". It tells the reader that he isn't actually what he's pretending to be. Not only that but the line in brackets always starts with "well". One other obvious correspondence between the two poems is the actual scheme and plot of the two. Both are to do with teenage hooliganism and both the "Nooligans" are very aggressive and violent. Take this excerpt from "Street Boy" which clearly shows us the aggressiveness of the hooligan. My head is full of silence My mouth is full of shout What those two lines mean are that he isn't intelligent and ...read more.

Conclusion

This makes us laugh at the "Nooligan" instead of be scared of him. Don't give a toss ...I'm the boss Those two sentences aren't quite aggressive and violent as the "Nooligan" is supposed to be. On the contrary, the tone in "Street Boy" is aggressive and strong. Gareth Owen uses a stronger vocabulary which makes us think that the boy actually is what he's saying he is. The words "stompin'", "silence", "spaced", "stoned" all show that. In conclusion, the two poems are very interesting and engaging in terms of the use of words, tone, structure etc. The poets Roger McGough ("Nooligan") and Gareth Owen ("Street Boy") use specific techniques to give the poems a certain effect. Something worth mentioning is that the poems relate to all teenagers in general since the name of the "Nooligan" and the "Street Boy" isn't given. So overall, there are a lot of similarities and differences between the two, but both are to the point and give you a general idea of what the poem is about. ...read more.

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