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The poems "The soldier" by Rupert Brooke and "Dulce et decorum est" by Wilfred Owen are related to the events in WWI.

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Introduction

Essay of War Poetry The poems "The soldier" by Rupert Brooke and "Dulce et decorum est" by Wilfred Owen are related to the events in WWI. These two poems concentrate on a similar subject, going to war, but have totally different points of view and contradict each other. Rupert Brooke has a patriotic point of view meanwhile Wilfred Owen has a critical opinion. Both of the authors use their own knowledge to show us how soldiers confront war and what consequences do war brings to soldiers. "The soldier" tells about soldiers dying for their own country. Rupert Brooke describes that if you are a soldier and if you die in a battlefield, you become part of the ground. He uses himself as an example, to express his opinion. He tells that he was from England and he represented this country, so if he died in battlefield and fell onto the ground, he would become a part of the ground, so as he is representing England, by forming a part to the ground, he leaves a part of England into it. ...read more.

Middle

By trying to explain their opinions the authors use different tool when writing the poems. Meanwhile Rupert Brooke uses a celebrative and cheerful tone, Wilfred Owen uses a tone of darkness, fear, suffering and terror. The authors describe totally different things. While Brooke describes the good English people and the beautiful geography in England, Owen describes the suffering of soldiers as the march tired and mood less ready to face their deaths. They use different poetic devices to support their ideas. In "The soldier" Brooke uses a similes (e.g.: Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day) meanwhile in "Dulce et Decorum Est" Owen uses imageries imagery (e.g.: If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood of froth-corrupted lung obscene as cancer bitter as the cud.) and similes (e.g.:Bent double like old beggars under sacks.) Both of the authors had their own experience in battlefields and they use these to show how they and other soldiers feel about going to war. ...read more.

Conclusion

are used. In this poem is described how soldiers marched tired and in a bad mood and then they face gas and lots of them died. The tone of this poem is one of darkness, fear, suffering and terror. Between the poetic devices used there are two imagery (one example is: If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood of froth-corrupted lung obscene as cancer bitter as the cud.), there are some similes( one example is: Bent double like old beggars under sacks.) and a Alliteration (But limped on, blood shod). While Rupert Brooke says that it is an honor to die for his country, because you leave a part of the country in the battlefield, Wilfred Owen says that soldiers do not want to go to war, because they know that it is only suffering. Two soldiers and two different views appear in these poems. While Rupert Brooke is patriotic, Wilfred Owen says that to die for a country and gain honor, is a lie. Wilfred Owen uses and excellent quote to express his feelings: The old Lie: "Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori." Iv?Rudnick 1-D ...read more.

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