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The Present

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Introduction

The Present Tick Tick Tick. As Alem lay on his bed the clock drew closer to midnight, more importantly closer to his thirteenth birthday. Alone. Distressed. Sad. Just as the clock hit twelve, the light went off and then he could hear the door creak. The moonlight from the window in his room helped Alem make out a gigantic figure that stepped in his room. Alem froze, thunderstruck. The ugly, vicious monster looked very gruesome as it drew an axe very near to Alem, who could not help shout, 'Aaaaaaaa!' Alem was sure he was going to die, but he was wrong. The next moment he saw the monster transform, noticing that the lights came back on. He could hear voices downstairs in the living room. He could not believe his eyes. It was his parents. Alem should have known that the monster was his Mum and Dad as they were both actors. He could make out a chorus of 'Happy Birthday!' ...read more.

Middle

More significantly, it was no fun. Next day when Alem returned from school, tired of listening to his friends talking about their Playstation 2 console, he now desperately wanted one. His other excuse was that he was really bored playing with his old Playstation console and wanted the newer one. Alem was so obsessed for a new console that as he dressed into his tracksuit in front of his new mirror he started talking to himself, 'I wish Mum and Dad bought me a Playstation 2 console.' The next second there was a crunch of gravel outside as Alem's Dad's car pulled back into the driveway, then the clunk of the car doors, and footsteps on the garden path. Alem's Dad entered his room and said, 'Hello son, guess what we got for you, a Playstation 2 console!' Alem was simply overwhelmed, his heart full of joy. He decided not to waste any more time and so dashed towards his Dad and saw what he wanted. ...read more.

Conclusion

On his way home from school to the bus stop Alem came across some older boys. They were insulting each other in a playful manner and Alem could not help laughing at one of them getting bullied. That boy came next to him and said, 'What are you laughing at, fatty?' Alem was quite overweight compared to other boys of his age. The older boys kept bullying Alem all the way to the bus stop, when Alem could not take it and answered back, the boys became furious and started hitting him. He got away as quickly as possible. When Alem got back home with his bruises, he was frustrated. He was thwarted and felt very miserable with himself. Why couldn't he fight back? Why was he such a coward, running away? He asked himself. He changed his clothes as usual and forgot about the mirror in front of him as he spoke, 'I wish I was never born.' Next second he was gone. FOREVER. GCSE Original Writing English Coursework Abid Rasheek Amin 10S 20300 Ms. Basson Room 103 Page 1 ...read more.

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