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The presentation of Mr. Lockwood in "Wuthering Heights" The novel, "Wuthering Heights", begins in the year 1801,

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Introduction

The presentation of Mr. Lockwood in "Wuthering Heights" The novel, "Wuthering Heights", begins in the year 1801, where we as readers are firstly introduced to the character Mr. Lockwood. Mr. Lockwood narrates the entire novel throughout, almost like an entry in his diary. Lockwood, a young London gentleman, is a newcomer to the Yorkshire Moors, Wuthering Heights. The novel opens after he has just returned from a visit with his landlord and neighbour, Mr. Heathcliff about Thrushcross Grange. One of my first impressions of the character after reading the opening chapter of the novel is that he is enthusiastic about renting out Thrushcross Grange, " Mr. Lockwood, your new tenant, sir- I do myself the honour of calling as soon as possible after my arrival, to express the hope that I have not inconvenienced you by my perseverance in soliciting the occupation of Thrushcross Grange. ...read more.

Middle

Lockwood, who comes from a more domesticated region of England finds himself in a less sociable area. My impression is that Lockwood is interested about the people and about the setting, he wishes to learn more about them by how he shows curiosity. " I felt interested in a man who seemed more exaggeratedly reserved than myself." Once Lockwood has been granted permission, grudgingly by Heathcliff, he enters his house. He encounters an incident with some of Heathcliff's dogs, although Heathcliff did warn him about them, to which he pulls faces provoking them to attack him, to which neither Heathcliff or the servant Joseph seems to bother about. Fortunately for Lockwood, a female servant comes and shoos the dogs away. Although Lockwood is not injured, he appears to sulk in a childish manner, resulting in Healthcliff making up for this incident when he sees how angry Lockwood is. ...read more.

Conclusion

In my opinion, Mr. Lockwood decides to give Mr. Heathcliff the benefit of the doubt in regards to his cold behaviour. I think he tries to imagine various reasons for Mr. Heathcliff's cool demeanour, before realising his landlords reasons for his behaviour may be quite different from his own. Mr. Lockwood, a somewhat vain and presumptuous gentleman deals very clumsily with the inhabitants of Wuthering Heights. He finds himself at a loss when he witnesses the strange household's disregard for the social conventions that have always structured his world. As a narrator, his vanity and unfamiliarity with the story occasionally lead him to misunderstand events. His initial visit to Wuthering Heights, in which the mysterious relationships and lurking resentments between the characters create an air of mystery, in particular Lockwood's ghostly nightmares, during the night he spent in Catherine's old bed. I think that many of the events that happen in the opening chapters of the novel prefigure many of the events that are to come and show the qualities of the character Mr. Lockwood. ...read more.

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