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The Prologue of Romeo and Juliet The prologue was a very important part of old English drama. The prologue makes the audience aware of the nature of the play

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Introduction

Stephen Snider The Prologue of Romeo and Juliet The prologue was a very important part of old English drama. The prologue makes the audience aware of the nature of the play and what will happen even before the play begins. A prologue is defined as a speech or poem delivered by one person at the beginning of a play or act. William Shakespeare uses a prologue called the Chorus in his play, Romeo and Juliet. This chorus provides background information on the play, the main characters and how the play will end. A prologue is somewhat like the trailers of a movie. They show part of the movie and what is going to happen to make the public want to see this movie. The same is true for the prologue in Romeo and Juliet. ...read more.

Middle

"Two households, both alike in dignity, / In fair Verona where we lay our scene, / From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, / Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean."(Prologue lines 1-4) There is a very old quarrel between these two families. These citizens of Verona are supposed to be civil. But line four reveals that they are obviously not. They engage in civil wars and shed 'civil blood' in 'fair Verona.' Neither of these two proud and honourable families can take the blame for starting this 'ancient' feud but they both must share the blame, since both sides mutiny against the peace of the city and make their 'civil hands unclean.' The second section of the Chorus tells how this problem will be solved, what the main plot is, and what kind of play this is. ...read more.

Conclusion

Against the dark background of their deaths, Romeo and Juliet's love shines bright, and in the end triumphs by ending the feud between their families. The last three lines of the prologue: 'Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage; / The which, if you with patient ears attend, / What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.' tells us that all this will be shown in two hours and if anything is lacking in the performance of the actors will be fixed as best as it can be the actors. In conclusion, a prologue or Chorus is a very important thing in Literature. Although some may argue that it gives away the story, it is my opinion that a prologue gives a story more life. It allows the reader to find out if this book is worthwhile to read. It also provides a sense of anticipation for the book to complete what the prologue has said. ...read more.

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