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The relationship between Eddie and Catherine changes throughout the play. Discuss.

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Introduction

The relationship between Eddie and Catherine changes throughout the play. Discuss. The relationship between Eddie and Catherine is in a downward spiral leading to the tragedy that will inevitably occur at the conclusion of the play. Alfieri makes this clear in his opening passage describing it as a "bloody course" that he was "powerless" to avert. Considering this it is obvious that the relationship is due to change significantly from the cheery "Hi, Eddie!" at the start of the play to the doomed ending. But the reasons for this dramatic change are what we must consider to understand the somewhat awkward relationship between uncle and niece. From the start of the play we can see undertones of the incestuous relationship in the household. Initially, it is key that we first see Eddie with Catherine rather than his wife, Beatrice. It actuates a sense of confusion within the reader about this relationship; this is only stressed by Eddie's reaction: "He is pleased and therefore shy about it" We can see that the reaction of Eddie to his nieces' simple greeting is somewhat abnormal. ...read more.

Middle

He insists for Rodolfo to stop singing even though Catherine thoroughly enjoys it; his excuse is "you don't want to be picked up, do ya". Furthermore the idea of Eddie's need for control is shown here: "What's the high heel for Garbo?" Here, Eddie compares the character of Catherine with a movie star of impure nature, whereas previously he had compared her with the likes of Madonna, the Virgin Mary. This indicates a clear shift in their relationship. Eddie has already begun to view Catherine as an impure form. It is also the first indication of the influence of the movies. The movies are seen as one of the major ideals of the great American Dream - the way in which Eddie uses this shows the dark sexually motivated thoughts that go through his mind. Moreover it is linked with Broadway, where Eddie realises the "tramps" representative of the sexual nature of the place, in comparison to Rodolfo, whose innocence and naivety lead him to think only of the operas. ...read more.

Conclusion

This loss of respect and essentially friendship heightens the eventual tragedy. The boxing lesson and the chair-lifting contest show this domestic trouble. Instead of respecting each other they have turned family life into a competition. The reaction of Catherine toward Eddie's clearly threatening behaviour in the event of the boxing lesson is very significant. Catherine is not threatened as she knows the way in which Eddie thinks: "You wanna dance, Rodolfo" Catherine says this in deference to Eddie; she knows that Eddie will not like the idea of them dancing together. Their relationship has now changed so much that they are at a point of actually hurting each other. Catherine's refusal to go along with Eddie is courageous but at this stage in their relationship it is in fact worthless, and only makes Eddie more furious in a way that he must call the Immigration police. Overall the relationship has changed dramatically due to the entrance of Rodolfo and Eddies continuing jealousy. A View From The Bridge Bimal Sualy 11L Page 1 of 3 ...read more.

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