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The Relationship of Lady Macbeth and Macbeth in the Shakespeare Play "Macbeth".

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Introduction

The Relationship of Lady Macbeth and Macbeth in the Shakespeare Play "Macbeth" In this essay I will attempt to in detail describe the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth in the play "Macbeth". Their relationship has many ups and downs and their mental state and dominance changes from scene to scene, and I will attempt to talk about this. At the start of the play Lady Macbeth and Macbeth are equals and are not the stereotypical family of the time as the man was normally the dominant at this point in time. Macbeth shows how he regards Lady Macbeth as an equal in his letter to Lady Macbeth telling her about his meeting with the witches by using the line "my dearest partner of greatness" (1:5:9-10). At this time in the play Lady Macbeth and Macbeth are both clear of conscience. As the play progresses Lady Macbeth becomes the dominant character and this is shown by her convincing Macbeth to murder King Duncan although he feels that Duncan has been good to him recently and his is family and a good king and so strongly disagrees with Lady Macbeth's plan to kill Duncan. ...read more.

Middle

This is in my opinion where Lady Macbeth first becomes conscience stricken as although she does not show any clear signs to the reader it is the point at which Macbeth does not need to aid him tell him what to do Lady Macbeth and has become evil in his own right. At this point in the play it could be disputed as to whether Macbeth is truly evil as it is only due to his ambition that he was tempted by his wife and the three witches into killing Duncan and the many subsequent murders that take place because of Macbeth's fear of an uprising which could be said to be paranoia. Because Lady Macbeth is behind a lot of the dark imagery in the play many people regard her as "The Fourth Witch". Macbeth is at his height at the start of Act 3 Scene 4 which is in between the killing of Fleance and when he sees a ghost of his good friend Banquo who was killed when Fleance escaped from the Murderers. ...read more.

Conclusion

She eventually commits suicide as her conscience overwhelms her as she battles to come to terms with the destruction and evil that she alongside her husband has caused. It is at this point in the play that the reader is shown a glimmer of hope in the relationship between Macbeth and his wife as he seems to care when he asks the doctor "cans't thou not minister to a mind diseased" (5:3). This quote is showing the reader that Macbeth still cares for his wife and that he is distraught when he discovers that she is ill. At the end of the play Lady Macbeth is said to have committed suicide and Macbeth is dead. The witches have succeeded in damning Macbeth with the help of Lady Macbeth who is shown to be an incredibly evil character who eventually pays the price for her crimes. Macbeth dies with honour and Malcolm is proclaimed as king as the evil imagery is eradicated. By David Goldie 10JK ...read more.

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