• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The rigid class structure and social discrimination of Maycomb County had a profound effect on the events in the novel.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Black and White R . Ismail This essay deals with the topic of black and white and its relevance with the novel. As much as we may despise racism it was still however a cornerstone of the novel. I shall attempt to explain how the quote from Atticus encapsulates this theme so well. The rigid class structure and social discrimination of Maycomb County had a profound effect on the events in the novel. The impact of this class structure was especially evident in the trial of Tom Robinson, a Maycomb Negro. The extreme prejudice of the town eventually led to the unjust conviction of Robinson for a crime he did not commit. The society of Maycomb County had a definite structure. This structure contained four classes. ...read more.

Middle

The fourth and lowest class in Maycomb was best described as a "caste" because it was impossible to escape from it. All blacks were included in this group. Prejudice ran deep in Maycomb County. Although many classes existed within the black community, one of colour must always be in the lowest class. The blacks lived apart from the whites in their own section of town and seemed to have a society separate from the whites. The strong prejudice of Maycomb County and the negative effects of its social system were demonstrated by the trial of Tom Robinson. Tom was a hard-working, warm-hearted Negro who went out of his way to be kind and helpful to some poor white trash. He helped Miss Mayella because he felt sorry for her. ...read more.

Conclusion

Despite the jury's doubts pertaining to the Ewells' accusations against an innocent black man, they had to find in favor of Mayella because she was white. In spite of the jury's knowledge of Tom Robinson's character, they could not allow Mayella's accusations to go unanswered. To do so would have made the two races equal. There was no justice or mercy for a Negro, even one as respectable as Tom Robinson. Atticus may have stated this point best when referring to the jury's decision, "They've done it before and they did it tonight and they'll do it again and when they do it, seems that only children weep." An innocent black man falsely convicted of rape. The disappointing conclusion one draws from the novel was that at that time in the deep South of America, when white opposes black, white always wins. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Harper Lee section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Harper Lee essays

  1. Maycomb's Social Classes

    The first class would consist of well-off, white people. People such as Atticus Finch, a white lawyer would fit into this class along with Judge Taylor, Miss Maudie Attkinson, Miss Stephanie Crawford, Mrs. Merriweather, Ms. Gates and most of the neighbors of Maycomb.

  2. The Class and Caste of Maycomb County

    He is sincere and very straightforward. "...if Atticus Finch drank until he was drunk he wouldn't be as hard as some mean are at their best" (Lee 45). As Scout recalls, Miss Maudie Atkinson lived "...one door down from us..."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work