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The significance of the battle of the Somme

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Introduction

The significance of the battle of the Somme In military terms, there were many achievements by the British at The Battle of the Somme even though many losses were also sustained and instinctively it looked like a failure. The plan was to rise from the trenches and walk across no-mans land, slowly with arms spread wide. However, they were ignorant to the fact that the Germans were waiting for them with their machine guns at the ready. Many things went wrong with this assault for example some people say that the bombardment wasn't heavy enough, others say that enemy wire was not cut enough to let the allied troops through, leaving them as targets for machine guns, but many of the British shells were duds made by inexperienced workers and there was a considerable lack of communication between soldiers and from commanders over their battalions. ...read more.

Middle

Many machines were also enhanced as a result of their failure on the Somme such as the tanks which were perfected dramatically and could literally drive over the trenches. Tactics were also improved after the Somme where the 'creeping barrage' was used but not to its full extent. It was extremely successful, though, when used on July 15th. Another success was demoralising the Germans as backed up by source C where a soldier in the 110th infantry reserve wrote home saying 'we have had dreadful losses again. I shall not get leave I suppose until we have left the Somme, but with our losses what they are, this cannot be long or there will not be a single man left in the regiment' This shows just how desperate the German army was. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Somme deeply wounded the German army giving them a great disadvantage in the coming battles. The main aim of the battle of the Somme was to remove pressure on the French at Verdun. This was achieved drawing the battle to the Somme. This was a great step as it also gained the French trust, and allowed the British to fight alongside them. This also kept the French in the war as without British help they were losing greatly and just wouldn't have been able to continue. Finally, even though it was done of their own accord, the Germans retreated to higher ground. The British gained twelve kilometres at parts over four and a half months. This is a fairly small gain of a piece of land but they gained the land anyway so it is considered an achievement in itself, as the Germans retreated. ?? ?? ?? ?? James Levine history coursework - question 1 5/10/2007 ...read more.

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