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The Son's Veto: Thomas Hardy - The mother in this story sacrifices everything for a son who doesn't even seem to care about her. Women today would not act like this. Do you agree?

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Introduction

The Son's Veto: Thomas Hardy The mother in this story sacrifices everything for a son who doesn't even seem to care about her. Women today would not act like this. Do you agree? The son's veto is a story about a woman, Sophy, who marries the local vicar out of respect not love. They have a child and because of his high class background and her lower class history she is looked down upon by all. When the vicar eventually dies, she meets up with her first love, Sam, and wants to re-marry. The son who cares only for himself, because of the way Sophy raised him, and tells her firmly that she will not marry and eventually becomes violent towards her. Upon looking at the title of the story 'The Son's Veto it will become fairly obvious to the reader that the son will veto something. Veto: 1. The power to prevent legislation or action proposed by others. 2. To refuse consent to a proposal 3. To prohibit, ban or forbid. Looking at how the story develops the reader would know that he would veto something that Sophy wants, this being the marriage of her to Sam. Women in the past have always been seen as inferior to men and this story is very pro women's rights. The book was written in about the late nineteenth century, late twentieth century when women were treated like this. ...read more.

Middle

Sophy did indeed swear that she wouldn't marry Sam and Randolph becomes a most disliked character in the Story at this point and even more so when Sophy dies. I would say that the son did not love his mother but only himself as he put himself before his mother and treated her as you would a dog in a cage, on numerous occasions he contradicted and chastised Sophy. We first see Sophy as a mother taking Randolph to a concert. Hardy opens the story with a description of her hair and tells us that she is an invalid. The audience, are fascinated and cannot take their eyes off the woman in the wheel-chair, 'Almost all turned their heads to take a full and near look at the interesting woman' From looking at the hair they then conclude that she is very beautiful; their hopes unfortunately are dashed, as when she's turns around she isn't as beautiful as people had expected. This being that all ready her life is taking it toll on its body. Upon marrying Mr. Twycott she becomes an unhappy and lonely person however before this she seemed to have some social life as her relationship with Sam would show. She was a very submissive person and our perfect example of this is "Say no more perhaps I am wrong! ...read more.

Conclusion

Twycott would be the house she inherited after his death. She married Mr. Twycott not for love but out of respect and that inadvertently killed her in the end. If she was to go against her arrogant sons wishes and marry Sam she would, I believe, not have died at the end of the story but led a happy life with Sam as she did when she was with him. I think Hardy did not approve of her marrying Mr. Twycott and did this through her death, He probably felt that as she was committing, literally suicide, by not marrying like Mr. Twycott who committed social suicide by marrying her. I personally don't approve of her decision as, as a reader, I feel that as Randolph was an evil character and didn't even love his mother he did not have any right or authority to 'advise' or force Sophy not to marry Sam. To conclude I finish by answering the question. I believe that woman today would not act like this as society has changed. Women are no longer, although by some they are, treated, as an inferior being to men and most would not stand for the treatment Sophy suffered from her son. The intelligence of today's society would also make a mother of today notice that her son hated her and maybe the lack of intelligence that Sohpy had or maybe just her complete naivety and stubbornness led to her death with most mothers today would disagree with 100% By Peter Mc Reynolds S2B ...read more.

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