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The Story of an Hour

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Introduction

In The Story of an Hour, the author makes a rhetorical argument which delivered the message that even though you may think you love someone to the extent of wanting to spend the rest of your life with them, you may be just as happy or happier alone and out of their chains. This argument is clearly shown when the author states, "But she saw beyond that bitter moment a long procession of years to come that would belong to her absolutely" (112). This quote visibly shows that she welcomed the death of her husband because she was joyous of her years to come being alone. When Louise whispered under her breath, "Free, free, free," and "Free! ...read more.

Middle

Men and women treat themselves to vacations and things that they could not due during their "marriage to their work." They find pleasure in what the once could not do. This is all due to the face that when you are around a single thing or place for such a long period of your life, you feel imprisoned in it or as though you are a slave to your work. In our modern world, the situation with Mr. and Mrs. Mallard can be closely related to divorce and vacation. Having an "escape" route possible allows people to find relaxation when times get rough or if work is too hard. People look at leaving unfinished business in the hands of other people a possible route to happiness. ...read more.

Conclusion

No one was there to bother her or take up her time. In our modern world, the situation with Mr. and Mrs. Mallard can be closely related to divorce and vacation. Having an "escape" route possible allows people to find relaxation when times get rough or if work is too hard. People look at leaving unfinished business in the hands of other people a possible route to happiness. In "The Story of an Hour," Louise found that her husband dying in the accident was a route to happiness and joy. She thought that "a kind intention or a cruel intention made the act seem no less a crime as she looked upon it in that brief moment of illumination," was her way of saying that it didn't matter what happened because now she can live a quiet happy life (112). No one was there to bother her or take up her time. ...read more.

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