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The symbolism of the beast in Lord of The Flies

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Introduction

The symbolism of the Beast & its significance to characters in LOTF In LOTF the beast is a symbol of fear, and is represented by Golding in many different ways. It is not only a physical thing, but also a presence within all of the boys, which creates an atmosphere of darkness, and horror. It is one of the signs that Golding uses to show that the island isn't as beautiful as it may seem, and that it has a dark side too. The beast is introduced when the littluns says that he has seen a "snake thing", describing it as "big and horrid." ...read more.

Middle

This shows his hunter- gatherer quality. Piggy is the rational one, and says that "life is scientific", and that the beast doesn't exist. He gets close to the truth when he explains to the boys that it is possible to be "frightened of people." (The beast is within us all.) Simon is also very rational. He suggests that the only thing they should all fear is the savagery and evil in human nature. He says that the beast is "only us", using his wisdom and knowledge. As the novel progresses, the beast becomes more real. Sam and Eric, think that the dead parachutist is the beast, and only Simon is brave enough to go and look, and he discovers the truth. ...read more.

Conclusion

He keeps them feeling insecure and threatened. All the boys see the beast in different ways, and have different approaches to it. The beast is symbolized mainly as the fear within the boys, and Golding shows that it is inevitable that a group of young boys would feel that way when stranded on an island all alone. Only Simon and Piggy realize this, and the others seem too caught up in the fun of the island to see the reality. Golding says at the end of the novel, "Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of a man's heart." Shows that in the end, all the boys, in particular Ralph have lost their innocence because the beast and dark side in all of them has been revealed. ...read more.

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Response to the question

This essay question asks candidates to discuss how William Golding presents "The Beast" in his novel 'Lord of the Flies'. The candidates must recognise how Golding presents the beast and it's effect on both the reader and, because of their ...

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Response to the question

This essay question asks candidates to discuss how William Golding presents "The Beast" in his novel 'Lord of the Flies'. The candidates must recognise how Golding presents the beast and it's effect on both the reader and, because of their age and vulnerability, the effect on the characters, too. The candidate also does well to expand their thematic and social awareness of what "The Beast" represents and how Golding wasn't just speaking for the young boys, but for all of society when the fear of "the beast within" enthralled them so completely that it permanently destroyed their innocence.

Level of analysis

This candidate has done this very well, addressing the important characters and how they each react to the phenomenon of "The Beast" both physically and mentally. The candidate gains top marks for lifting the novel and it's themes off the page and expand them into what they say about society - that the degradation of civilisation and humanity is to be predicted and a potential threat in the form of "The Beast" makes it "inevitable that a group of young boys would feel that way when stranded on an island all alone". To earn even higher marks, candidates might take it even further; note that "The Beast", wonderfully presented by this candidate as the "fear within the boys", threatens the fragile construct of our world of democracy and civilisation, and in this urgent paranoia we see the downfall of our humanity and a rise in our primitive, animalistic incentives.

Quality of writing

The Quality of Written Communication is fine. Not perfect in anyway, but no error featured in this candidate's response is any cause for concern. The answer uses a range of vocabulary and the spelling, punctuation and grammar are relatively in-check.


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