• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The television drama Jessica directed by Anthony Buckley and produced by Peter Andrikidis

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The television drama Jessica directed by Anthony Buckley and produced by Peter Andrikidis, is a powerful medium for presenting the importance of sex in a relationship, gender expectations and discrimination. The protagonist, Jessica is a young woman living in the small frontier town of Narrandera, and is constantly looked down upon by others for being a tomboy. Jessica's mother, Hester, is desperate to secure a wealthy future for herself and daughter, Meg, by forcing her to marry. Jack Thomas, the son of the richest family in town is burdened with being the perfect man chosen by Hester. Unfortunately, he falls in love with Jessica and this proves to be large problem for the two, as neither family will accept their feelings. The importance of sex in a relationship, gender expectations and discrimination are expressed through camera, sound effects and characters. Sex was forbidden for those unmarried in the early 20th century, and lack of contraception meant that if pregnancy occurred, the pair would be forced to marry due to bad reputation. According to drama, sex is important in conveying the feelings we have for one another, whether positive or negative. There are two sex scenes in the drama, and these are between Jack and Meg, and Jack and Jessica. ...read more.

Middle

When Jessica goes to get a job at Riverview, the town's most established estate, she is asked "where? In the house?" This shows that women are simply expected to work in the house, not the farm. She and her father persevere and get her a job despite the fact that "shearing's not girl's work." When she goes to thank her boss, Mr Thomas, he scolds her and tells her that she can only "speak when...spoken to and never to [him]" he also adds that "she won't get the same wages as a boy....she's a girl for cry sake." Jessica works hard in the shearing shed, and at lunchtime a bell is rung to notify the "gentlemen." Jessica isn't even acknowledged as she isn't seen as important to anyone other than the men she serves lunch to. Later on, she is assaulted as the men don't want her there. She gets tar spread throughout her hair and when she cuts it off, her mother gets angry. "A woman's hair is the gift from the Lord!" she informs Jessica, believing that she can't be a woman if she doesn't have long hair. Meg later comments on the War, saying she believes it to be romantic. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Billy tries to get a job at the Thomas', Jack's family objects and claims they "don't want that bloody lunatic working" at their house. In the end, they agree, though only through persuasion from Jack, and he has to ask that Billy gets "fair treatment" as he knows they won't. Obviously, they treat him awfully, as he later murders Mrs Thomas and her two daughters. Mrs Thomas "hated him...made him move big rocks...and afterwards he had no skin on his hands and he was crying." During his trial, Jessica gets asked whether "he was well-liked," and she answers "yeh, everyone liked Billy" and after the accident, he had just Jessica and Jack. Without Jessica and Jack's support, Billy's life would've been even harder than necessary through his awful treatment. The townspeople's changing view and bad treatment of Billy is shown through the characters and camera. The idea that television drama is a powerful medium for presenting human experiences like the importance of sex in a relationship, gender expectations and discrimination, is conveyed throughout the drama series Jessica. Jessica is produced by Anthony Blakely and Peter Andrikidis, and they manipulate camera, sound effects and characters to portray the above experiences. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. From studying Source A, whish is part of an article written in the East ...

    every 10 minutes, where the Ripper may have taken out his next offence. It also increased the amount of police officers working on the case, using the evidence that they were being provided with to try and catch the Ripper, with extra experienced police men - detectives - who knew

  2. The House in the Valley

    Tim opened up the back and took out a knife and a hammer. He said to Nathan that they would most probably come in useful. They walked to the cellar opening, hiding the weapons behind them they went down in there and said to Jack that it was a disgrace and that they felt they should clean it up.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work