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The Tempest

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Introduction

The Tempest The Tempest was supposed to be Shakespeare's last play. It is unlike any other Shakespeare play. It contains magic and supernatural things. In Shakespeare's time, people believed in magic because they had poor education and could not explain natural events. The tempest is the symbol of change. In the Tempest, order has been upset by the overthrow of Prospero. The storm brings the people responsible to the island so that order can be restored. The beginning of 'The Tempest' starts with a great thunderstorm. Hence The Tempest. "A tempestuos noise of thunder and lightning heard." So already Shakespeare is getting the audiences attention by starting off the play with a ship in the middle of a storm. During the storm, Boatswain talks to noble men with a polite manner, but after when he lose his temper, he curses and is blasphemous. "A plague upon this howling! Have you a mind to sink?" ...read more.

Middle

This gives the audience information about the background of the play and clarifies what happened in the first scene. Once the audience discovers that the storm is not natural and find out that Prospero created the storm, it then keeps them engrossed in the play. By doing this, Shakespeare makes the audience think what kind of a man Prospero really is. Prospero uses fewer words to create more meaningful images. "He needs will be." Prospero also uses contractions during his speech. "Which thou heard'st cry, which thou saw'st sink." This shows the urgency of Prospero to tell his story. Prospero shows his feelings to the audience this makes his story telling more dramatic. After Prospero's long speech, the audience is introduced to Ariel, who is known as a creature of the supernatural. Prospero is pleased with Ariel for having completed his work. "My brave spirit." But Prospero tells him there is more to do. "At least two glasses. The time 'twixt six and now must by us both be spent most preciously." ...read more.

Conclusion

This is followed with Calibans account of the story which gets even more sympathy from the audience. The scene ends with the introduction of Ferdinand and the meeting with Miranda who immediately falls in love with him. Although Prospero wants the two to fall in love, he does not speak in a kind way towards him. This explains to the audience that he does not want Ferdinand to take Miranda for granted, otherwise he will not value her. At this point the audience is faced with Miranda who is no longer obedient, she gives more of her affection to Ferdinand and she is willing to defy her father for this mans love. Prospero becomes very angry with his daughter. "My foot my tutor?" He tells her that if she continues, she will make him hate her. "Silence! One word more shall make me childe thee, if not hate thee." The end of act one radically alters our impression of Prospero and Shakespeare has engaged the audience's attention. ?? ?? ?? ?? How, in the plays opening scenes does Shakespeare effectively engage the audiences attention? Nicolas Lysandrou ...read more.

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