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The tempest act 1 scene 2 - Explore thedramatic significance of this episode within the play.

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Introduction

Look at act one scene 2. Explore the dramatic significance of this episode within the play. Adam Hepburn The tempest by William Shakespeare is a play that takes place in one afternoon, on an enchanted island in the middle of the open sea somewhere between Africa and Italy. The story is based on two characters Prospero, and his daughter Miranda who were cast away from Milan onto an island where for eight years they have to fend for themselves in order to survive. However Prospero spots a ship sailing near to the shore of the island and quickly realises that Alonso and Antonio, the people that cast him away from Milan were, among others on board of the ship. Prospero uses this opportunity to seek revenge on the people that betrayed him. Using his magical powers and the aid of an airy spirit named Ariel, Prospero whips up a storm that pushes the boat over leaving the occupants to frantically swim to the shore of the island for safety. ...read more.

Middle

Miranda appeals to her father to use his magical powers to calm the storm, not realising that it is his magic that has caused the tempest. She says she has seen the ship break up on the rocks and heard the shrieks of drowning seamen. Her tender heart is filled with pity. Her father reassures her and tells her the shipwreck has not injured anyone. He explains that he has caused the storm and shipwreck for a reason takes place in one afternoon, on an enchanted island in the middle of the open sea somewhere between Africa and Italy. Twelve years earlier, Prospero was the Duke of Milan, and Miranda was his only heir. Prospero had a younger brother, Antonio, to whom he had entrusted the business of ruling the dukedom while he himself spent his time learning as much as he could. Unfortunately, while Prospero was concentrating on his studies, Antonio was busy making plans to seize the dukedom for himself, with the help of Alonso, King of Naples. ...read more.

Conclusion

The young Prince Ferdinand is separated from the other royal party and thinks they have all perished. After listening to Ariel's account, Prospero tells him that during the next couple of hours they have much work to do. Ariel, however, reminds Prospero that he has been promised his liberty for the work he has already done. At this Prospero flies into a rage. He scolds Ariel and calls him an ungrateful wretch who has already forgotten the torment from which he has been freed. He then proceeds to tell the story of how the airy spirit first came under his command. When Prospero first landed on the enchanted island, he found Ariel imprisoned in a pine tree by an evil witch named Sycorax. When Sycorax died, Ariel could not free himself and had been stuck in the spell for twelve years. Prosperous heard Ariel's wailing and released him. After recounting this story, Prospero promises Ariel his freedom within a week if all of his orders are properly carried out. He then sends Ariel to fetch Ferdinand, the young prince, and bring him to his part of the island. Printed by R. Hepburn 01/05/07 ...read more.

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