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The three stories I have looked at are "The Speckled Band", "The Engineers Thumb" and "The Man with the Twisted Lip". My main focus is on the character Dr Watson and how Doyle illustrates him

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Introduction

Looking at "The Speckled Band" and two other stories comment on the way Conan Doyle uses the character Watson I the stories. I have read three stories of Sherlock Holmes, written by the famous author, Sir Conan Doyle. The three stories I have looked at are "The Speckled Band", "The Engineers Thumb" and "The Man with the Twisted Lip". My main focus is on the character Dr Watson and how Doyle illustrates him. I know that Dr Watson is affectionate by the way he approaches people, I saw this in "The Engineers Thumb", when he is caring for Mr Hatherly's severed thumb, and how he treated it. Also in "The Man with the Twisted Lip" he cares for Kate Whitney and gives her advice to do about Isa because he has not been home for two days. ...read more.

Middle

He is very fond of Holmes and id a very good companion as he always does investigations with Holmes I refer to this in "The Speckled Band" when Holmes is at the end of bed and tells Watson about a client and a investigation they are going to have to look into an investigation and he replies "I would not miss it for anything". This tells me that he will always be there for Holmes to help him out, in my words an acolyte. When you have a friend then you must have trust in the friend so Watson has a great level of trust in Holmes. Holmes is not the brightest person either as it is always Holmes that works out the investigation, as Holmes realised what the speckled band was in the "The Speckled Band". ...read more.

Conclusion

This tells us that Watson is telling the story for us, in other words the narrator. When Watson narrates though his voice is not impersonal to Holmes as he does have the greatest respect for him, we can tell this by when Holmes is at the end of his bed in "The Speckled Band" he narrates " just a little resentment, for I was in myself in regular habits". This does not show hate to Holmes it just shows a bit of annoyance as he is at the end of the bed, when Watson is waking up in the morning, and Holmes is seeing him do habits which everybody does when they wake in the morning. I can tell through this that he does not seem too pleased about Holmes at the end of the bed, but still even though he is he shows a lot of respect to Holmes. ?? ?? ?? ?? Joseph Edwards ...read more.

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