• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Time Machine.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Time Machine Coursework Most of the story "The Time Machine" is written in first person narrator. "I told you all last Thursday..." This narrator is the main character, the Time Traveller. However, at the end of the novel, the narrator changes to a reporter. The reporter is telling the story through his eyes. This is because in the epilogue the Time Traveller was not around to tell the story, as he went missing The Time Traveller comes across arrogant, as he believes he knows best, and nothing could go wrong. "Very calmly I tried to strike the match...the match were of that abominable kind that light only on the box." And "'Communism' I said to myself." This shows a lack of responsibility, because he believes everything is should be more advanced. His arrogance also allows him to get the better of him. ...read more.

Middle

As a result to this, on a major scale, something like what the Time Traveller witnessed in the future could therefore happen. Right the way through the novel, the Time Traveller meets two different types of characters. The Eloi and Morlocks. From moment he entered the future, he has known of the Eloi, as they met him as soon as he arrived. They didn't seem too concerned about the Time Traveller in their environment. "I was continually meeting more of these men of the future, who would follow me a little distance... laugh about me, and, having smiled and gesticulated in a friendly way, leave me again to my own devices." As for the Morlocks, they were much more interested in the Time Traveller, but for a other reasons. "The Morlocks at any rate were carnivorous!" and "They started away, and then I could feel them approaching me again. ...read more.

Conclusion

HG Wells' book therefore has a similar speculation like Darwin's theory of evolution, and that in fact the Genesis was wrong. However, to compare the understanding and knowledge from the time when HG Wells wrote this novel and the development and discoveries of today's world as well as a far more relaxed viewpoint to religion, the Time Machine by today's standards would not be a literary argument. Today, readers would not dislike the character, but they may question his ways of preparation, but today we have further technology, so the views may be divided. I believe that the character the Time Traveller would have been disliked in the Victorian era. This is because of the controversy about religion. People would have though what the character was doing was unruly as he was essentially going against God and possibly varying the way of the future. Some people didn't want to know what was going to happen, they may have felt threatened, but on the other hand, the Victorians found the unknown very interesting. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE H.G. Wells section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE H.G. Wells essays

  1. How is The Time Machine representative of the late victorian era?

    Wells includes a huge white sphinx in the story. He may have included this because it was around about the time when Britain was getting very interested in archaeology and especially in Egypt with all the pyramids. Sphinxes had been found in Egypt and so to interest the reader Wells added it because the Victorian society were very interested in new things.

  2. The Time Machine

    Many things in the book reflect to the ideas of great 19th Century thinkers and the Industrial Revolution. In the 19th Century during the Industrial Revolution, there was a big difference between the rich and the poor. The rich lived luxurious lives doing nothing whilst the poor had no other

  1. What is H.G Wells trying to tell the readers about humanityIn his novel 'The ...

    Wells is justifying just how the eloi and the morlocks just came to be. He explains that the problems originate from his own age, of how the seemingless widening between the upper and lower class, and the whole position that existed in the age of the time traveller was the key to the whole situation that exists in the future.

  2. 'The Time Machine' by H.G.Wells - review

    H.G.Wells expresses his views on humanity, the society and the direction he saw the world going. It appears to me that the message H.G.Wells is trying to give us is to look at what would happen to humanity if we do not change.

  1. What is H.G. Wells trying to achieve with his novel The Time Machine? What ...

    In the next few days, the Time Traveller continues to explore the area, and in the process befriends one particular Eloi named Weena, who he saves from drowning. The Time Traveller, who normally sleeps outside, eventually meets the Morlocks, the other species who inhabit the planet in 802701.

  2. Time Machine

    captivated the reader The time machine novel takes the structure of an embedded narrative which is a story or concept contained within another story that comprises the majority of the text. I think Wells chose this as it allows easier interpretations and gives a view from two different perspectives to enhance assist the readers understanding.

  1. The Time Machine

    Wells description, of the future civilisation. Which consist of eloi and morlocks. Even though the novel uses a lot of exaggeration, it is strikingly similar to the Victorian civilisation. The novel uses science fiction to show the differences between the classes. Wells uses exaggeration on the roles of the classes by dividing humanity into two different beings and communities.

  2. The novel The Time Machine was published in 1895, at the height of the ...

    Today the law tells us that everyone has minimum working hours + payment, but in the Victorian times, this was different because they use to get treated unfairly. In the Victorian times, if an individual had 'leisure', this meant that they were rich and were classed as the upper class.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work