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The Time Machine

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Introduction

''The Time Machine'' by H.G Wells illustrated life in Britain at the end of the Victorian era. How far do you agree with this statement? ''The Time Machine'' by Herbert George Wells was published in 1895. At that time in Britain, the industrial revolution was taking place. The industrial revolution saw substantial change in Victorian Britain. The population was increasing, industry and travel had changed due to the invention of steam trains, electricity, and spinning jenny's. More people left the countryside to find work in mayor cities, factories were popping up across the country. The entire nation was changing in industry, society, and culture. All these inventions along with the industrial revolution saw massive change in Victorian Brittan. The population was escalating and there was increase in fear. All this fear brought about sci-fi. Chemistry and Physics developed as separate disciplines and Darwin made his discoveries in evolution. It is not surprising therefore; that the Victorians became interested in speculating about what man might be capable of, this introduced science fiction. Science fiction was taking of very well as authors such as Allen Poe and Mary Shelley (Frankenstein) came out. Progress was central to the Victorian era, as the benefits of the Industrial Revolution spread worldwide. Yet technology brought a dark side as well. Writers were starting to use sci-fi more. ...read more.

Middle

In the novel Wells portrays the morlocks as 'ape like creatures' with 'strange large greyish red eyes' almost like human spider. A subterranean species, of humankind that shy, away from the light and maintain strange technologies beneath the surface. He describes them as animals to show their inhuman behaviour and image. Wells does not describe the morlocks in depth, like the eloi. He does this to let the reader's imagination create an image based on the brief description. However, Wells does make sure to keep the morlocks description intact with their class, roles, work, and environment. In the novel, the morlocks represent the working class. The morlocks have adapted to their surroundings. They live and work underground in 'stuffy and oppressive' surroundings. Similar to the factories that were springing up across the Brittan. The y work to keep the upper class in luxury. This reminds the Victorians ''that the splendours of society are built on the backs of the masses''. The morlocks are not allowed education or free time. Wells uses the opposite of Darwin's theory, as the creatures are not evolving into more complex organisms, but instead more basic once. The novel constantly comments on ''great shapes like big machines, rose out of the dimness and cast grotesque black shadows''. ...read more.

Conclusion

In any case, H. G. Wells was essentially an Edwardian Writer (1901-1910). On a more positive note, the nineteenth century was the period when modern science developed for the first time. Chemistry and Physics developed as separate disciplines and Darwin made his discoveries in evolution. It is not surprising therefore, that the Victorians became interested in speculating about what man might be capable of in ways that earlier people in centuries had not. In fact, few people had really given free range to their thoughts in technological terms since Leonardo ad Vinci at the beginning of the sixteenth century. The Victorians also possessed a degree of self-confidence in man's abilities, which encouraged them to speculate. It is no accident that the first the first detective stories were also written in the second half of the nineteenth century and that Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, also wrote 'the Lost World'. On a more positive note, the nineteenth century was the period when modern science developed for the first time. Chemistry and Physics developed as separate disciplines and Darwin made his discoveries in evolution. It is not surprising therefore; that the Victorians became interested in speculating about what man might be capable of, this introduced science fiction. Science fiction was taking of very well as authors such as Allen Poe and Mary Shelley (Frankenstein) came out. Was ?? ?? ?? ?? - 1 - ...read more.

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